Course Offerings

The table below lists both undergraduate and graduate courses currently offered at NYU that are at least partially concerned with inequality as a structural issue.

SchoolLevelCourse NumberTermTitleDescription
ABU DHABIUGCCOL-UH 1013Spring 2018Colonialism and Postcolonialism(Formerly CCOL-AD 13) Until very recently much of the world has lived under colonial rule. Major colonial powers shaped social, religious, and institutional life in countries that they controlled. This course explores the legacies of colonial rule. In this course we encounter the markedly different perspectives of the colonizers and the colonized and ask whether these can be reconciled both historically and in the context of the more contemporary postcolonial discourse. We ask how colonial practices have shaped the causes of global inequality and have influenced the dynamics of recent conflicts. We also engage with the notion of justice in the postcolonial context and ask whether former colonizers might have contemporary obligations toward their former subjects. This is a multidisciplinary course drawing on sources from the social sciences, history, and literature.
ABU DHABIUG
CCOL-UH 1018
Spring 2018Global Health Inequalities(Formerly CCOL-AD 18) Health inequalities count among the primary global challenges facing our contemporary world. But how should we understand their underlying causes? What is their relationship to processes of globalization? And what institutions and practices should be established and supported to best address them? Debates over these questions are fierce, reflecting a wide range of cultural understandings, economic interests, ecological endowments, and ethical positions. By considering case studies drawn from Asia, Africa, South and North America, and Europe, this course explores the heated politics of answering these questions. Given today's predominance of Global Health programs that aim to universalize evidence-based medicine (EBM) and to deliver public health via randomized control trials (RCTs), particular attention is paid to assessing these approaches from the vantage of their target populations.
ABU DHABIUGCCOL-UH 1035Spring 2018Inequality(Formerly CORES-AD 59W) Inequality is a fundamental issue with which every human society, past and present, has had to deal. This course explores why inequality occurs and why it matters, questions which have taken on critical importance in this time of deepening global inequalities. The course will approach these questions by considering inequality in comparative and historical perspective so that students will gain a deeper perspective on today's debates. While the course will focus on the wide-ranging consequences of inequality, particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between inequality and government. How does governmental action influence inequality, and why? Does the presence of inequality influence what type of government is possible? To answer these questions the course will draw on sources from a range of academic disciplines including political science, history, economics, philosophy, and literature. However, no prior expertise in any of these areas will be required. By the end of the course students will be in a better position to formulate their own normative opinions about inequality while also understanding how it functions in practice.
ABU DHABIUG
SRPP-UH 2621
Spring 2018Bound by Borders: Sociology of Law and MigrationLaw reflects how we have organized our social, economic, political and cultural relations. A good deal of sociological theory has developed to explain how and why laws have changed with the shift from older forms of socio-economic organization to capitalism. Sociologists and their kin have also found much grist for their mills in the gap between the letter of the law and its application. Students of the empirical aspects of law have a broad range of social domains to observe. This course narrows the range to laws that affect people's movement across country borders: international migration. Laws bind people within a political jurisdiction to each other and to their territory. We call the formal relationship between an individual and state organization that controls a territory and its members "nationality" or legal citizenship. The default assumption of many states has been that people stay put and that they are citizens. Migrants violate this assumption. In response, policymakers in both sending and receiving countries have responded with laws to reconcile the reality of mobile people with views of the "nation", and with economic needs and imperatives. Migration motivates the emergence and reconfiguration of important laws governing who can come and go, and the terms on which they can stay in another state's territory. How and why this happens interests not only policymakers, government officials and judges, but also individuals included or excluded by borders and scholars trying to understand these laws. This course takes a sociological view of law pertaining to international migration, as well as of its origins and effects. Specifically it asks why migration laws differ among countries, the patterns they take, how they change over time, and their impact on inequalities in receiving and sending countries. It considers explanations of the peculiar policymaking alliances that emerge around migration, where political regimes allow - as well as of factors that shape the success of policy proposals. The course takes a deliberately cross-national comparative perspective and examines instances of statelessness and refuge.
ABU DHABIUG
SRPP-UH 2618
Spring 2018Welfare States in Comparative Perspective(Formerly SRPP-AD 158) How do different countries respond to the challenges of poverty and economic inequality? How do they protect workers against the risks of unemployment, accident, illness, disability and old age? This course examines social policy in both advanced post-industrial democracies and the "Global South". The course will consider various ways in which "welfare regimes“ have been characterized and classified, particularly with regard to how welfare provision is divided up among state, market and family. The course will explore how social policies originate and change, paying attention to the role of organized interests, state institutions, and partisan politics in these processes. Lastly, the course will examine how contemporary challenges including globalization, population aging, post-industrialism and women's workforce participation have pressured and transformed welfare states. In all of these areas, students will pay particular attention to gender: how social policies have been shaped by, reinforced, and redressed gender inequalities.
ABU DHABIUGCSTS-UH 1059Spring 2018Urban Violence: The Middle EastThis course explores actors, narratives, experiences and historical processes that have combined to produce violent cities and societies in the last century or so. Using the modern and contemporary Middle East as a case study it addresses a number of questions that have acquired particular salience of late as a result of mounting urban bloodshed and destruction across the region and of the relentless global advance of sprawling urbanization, conflict and social inequality. How we can interpret, map and make sense of the increasingly close relationship between violence and the city in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? Given that urban pasts, presents and futures appear increasingly intertwined in what ways can understanding past histories of violence open up new areas of urban activism and public engagement? How can we study, debate and represent violence produced by cities and in cities without offending its past and present victims? This course approaches cities as spaces of violence and violence as a distinctively historical and spatial experience of urban life, politics and culture. One of the main ideas behind it is to territorialize and historicize the "urban" as an analytical category and to scrutinize the role of cities as the frameworks through which states and societies have ordered their knowledge, experience and practice of power, inequality, suffering and civility in the modern and contemporary worlds.
ABU DHABIUG
ECON-UH 3460
Spring 2018Poverty(Formerly ECON-AD 224) International organizations today define poverty as having to live with less than USD 1.90 a day at the prices observed in advanced countries. With such a definition, there are today a little less than 1 billion poor people in the world, or 13 percent of the global population. With the same definition, they were more than 90 per cent two centuries. This seems indeed a huge progress. Yet, there are serious questions behind that definition and those figures. Why USD 1.90 a day? Where does this figure come from? How satisfactory is a definition of poverty that implies that there is practically no poor person in the United States or Europe today? Should poverty be measured with a pure monetary metric? How should the subjective and social aspect of poverty be taken into account? Alternative definitions often paint a much less optimistic landscape, with poverty diminishing much more slowly and in some cases not at all. More fundamentally, how is it the case that, even with the 1.90 USD a day definition, there still are countries today where about half the population is below that level? What are the obstacles these countries face in trying to access a higher standard of living?
ABU DHABIUG
CCEA-UH 1014
Spring 2018Money and the Good Life(Formerly COREP-AD 38) This course examines a variety of cultural conceptions of money and wealth, and the ethical questions that money or wealth allows a writer to probe. Is the value of men measured by the value of their money, or are there other criteria for wealth? Is someone's wealth possible without someone else's poverty? How is human ambition rewarded or punished in the "pecuniary culture“? The course looks for answers to these and other questions in key works of literature, sociology, economics, and other fields, reading classical texts ranging from Aristophanes' Plutus, Ihara Saikaku's "A Dose of What the Doctor Never Orders,“ and William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, to Honore de Balzac's Pere Goriot, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, and F. Scott Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby. Readings are supplemented by excerpts from works by Ibn Khaldun, Adam Smith, Thorstein Veblen, Max Weber, and Alfred Hirshman.
ABU DHABIUGCCOL-UH 1013Spring 2018Colonialism and Postcolonialism
CCOL-UH 1013 Colonialism and Postcolonialism
(Formerly CCOL-AD 13) Until very recently much of the world has lived under colonial rule. Major colonial powers shaped social, religious, and institutional life in countries that they controlled. This course explores the legacies of colonial rule. In this course we encounter the markedly different perspectives of the colonizers and the colonized and ask whether these can be reconciled both historically and in the context of the more contemporary postcolonial discourse. We ask how colonial practices have shaped the causes of global inequality and have influenced the dynamics of recent conflicts. We also engage with the notion of justice in the postcolonial context and ask whether former colonizers might have contemporary obligations toward their former subjects. This is a multidisciplinary course drawing on sources from the social sciences, history, and literature.
CASUG
SCA-UA 180
Spring 2018Topics in Africana Studies
African-Amer Lang: Politics & Identity Gone Viral
Cinema & Social Change
The Darker Nations: Afro-Asian Culture & Literature
The Search for A Nation: From Obama to Trump
Explores specific issues dealing with the black urban experience, focusing on social and cultural institutions. Possible themes, which vary from semester to semester, include class and poverty, the police, urban development, education, sports, music, and art.
CASUGPHIL-UA 6Spring 2018Global EthicsThis course aims to accomplish two things. The first is to introduce three broad traditions of normative thinking about social issues from around the globe: a Confucian tradition, one based in Islamic legal traditions, and one derived from European liberalism. The second is to address three current areas of normative debate: about global economic inequality, about gender justice and human rights. We shall explore these first-order questions against the background of the three broad traditions. Our aim will be to understand some of differences of approach that shape the global conversation about these issues that concern people around the world.
CASUGFYSEM-UA 599Spring 2018Poetics of the UnsayableSilence, blank space, gaps, and fractures: attending to these formal elements in works of literature and art can pique understanding about some of the most difficult matters in human experience. Poet Rainer Maria Rilke claimed, in 1903, that "most experiences are unsayable,“ and in this course we will study the ways writers and artists, through expressions of silence itself, attempt to communicate those very experiences. How might we better understand the human through attention to those most hard-to-express experiences? With a special emphasis on works that blend the creative and the critical, this course will examine how scholars and creative thinkers over the past century have addressed problems of power, gender, oppression, and trauma, exploring means of expressing those urgent concerns that often feel unsayable. Through active exploration, students in this seminar will practice creative and critical approaches to investigate and convey difficult subjects that are often invisible or silenced. Exploring interdisciplinary fiction and non-fiction readings (as well as works of art), we ask: What are we finding difficult to say? What are we seeing or hearing or reading that helps us make sense of the difficulties in our world? And when and how might we powerfully, after all, break our silences?
CASUGFYSEM-UA 683Spring 2018Skin in Latin America: An Interdisciplinary Hist of Skin as a Political and Cultural FormationThe skin has the paradoxical function of connecting us with and separating us from the outside, which is why it is a productive metaphor for social relations. Skin is the space of human proximity, love, sex, and affection, the site for social interaction, a vague frontier between the self and the other. It is, for the same reason, also the site for racialization and otherization, and thus can translate into social dynamics of space segregation and oppression. We uncover the complexities of skin as a social space of subject formation by exploring landmarks of the history of the concept of skin as it was conceived by different traditions of cultural and social texts in Latin America, in legal documents, and in phenomenology and psychoanalysis, postcolonial studies, film, and fiction. We read racial legislation from early modern Spain to trace racialization to the notion of purity of blood. The early modern criminalization of sex (miscegenation and sodomy) initiated a social understanding of skin as an interlocking system where gender, race, and the rule of the state over bodies merged, producing different subjects. The revolutions of independence (that coincided in most Latin American countries with the abolition of slavery) altered the social space that the caste system had secured, and new discourses of modern equality disguised latent forms of racialization. Latin American nation-states were often constructed through national myths of colorblindness or narratives of "mestisaje" that claimed that racial differences had been overcome by the mixing of all races. We read Latin American literary texts (including Clarice Lispector, Carlos Monsiva is, Victoria Santa Cruz, Miriam Alves, Lohana Berkins, and Julieta Paredes) as well as visual texts, from casta paintings and colonial "comics" (Guaman Poma de Ayala's graphic chronicles) to contemporary films and art. We read these cultural texts along with influential transnational academic accounts of skin by Hegel, Frantz Fanon, Gilles Deleuze, Gloria Anzaldœa, Achille Mbembe, Michelle Ann Stephens, Josefina Saldana-Portillo, and Sara Ahmed.
CASUG
PHIL-UA 55
Spring 2018Philosophical Perspctive On Feminism & GenderEvaluation of the morality and rationality of typical female and male behavior and motivation and of the social institutions relating the sexes. Critical examination of proposals for change. Topics include development of gender- and non-gender-typed personalities; heterosexuality and alternatives; marriage, adultery, and the family; concepts of sexism and misogyny; and political and economic philosophies of sex equality and inequality.
CASUG
SCA-UA 19
Spring 2018Justice LabThis experimental, two-credit course will focus on understanding key points of social and political contention in the contemporary United States, including but not limited to: overseas war, ecological crisis, extra-judicial violence, economic inequality, reproductive rights, and deportation threat. There is no pre-set syllabus; rather, the curriculum will be developed collaboratively by students and faculty facilitators. Students will be expected to work in small groups, and to produce research that is responsive to events that are unfolding in real-time. Key goals of the course are: (1) to develop critical information-gathering, reading and communication skills that produce clear and accurate understanding of complex and contentious subjects, and (2) to learn how to engage in collaborative and deliberative decision-making toward the development of action-oriented strategies and tactics. As part of the course, students will be expected to attend and participate in SCA's program of spring events.
CASUG
SOC-UA 21
Spring 2018Sex and GenderWhat forms does gender inequality take, and how can it best be explained? How and why are the relations between women and men changing? What are the most important social, political, and economic consequences of this gender revolution? The course provides answers to these questions by examining a range of theories about gender in light of empirical findings about women's and men's behavior.
CASUG
SOC-UA 139
Spring 2018Crime and Violence in American CitiesIn this course we will focus our attention on one of the most pressing problems in U.S. cities: violence. We'll examine the concept of violent crime and learn about different perspectives on its causes, and we'll consider why there have been such dramatic fluctuations in American violence over the past 50 years and what can be done to control it. Throughout the course, we will approach the problems of crime and violence using the methods of social scientists. Each week we'll spend one meeting learning about the central concepts, findings, debates and questions in the study of crime and violence in the United States, and we'll spend the second meeting thinking about how to understand crime and violence through the collection and analysis of data.
CASUG
SOC-UA 451
Spring 2018The FamilyIntroduction to the sociology of family life. Addresses a range of questions: What is the relationship between family life and social arrangements outside the family (e.g., in the workplace, the economy, the government)? How is the division of labor in the family related to gender, age, class, and ethnic inequality? Why and how have families changed historically? What are the contours of contemporary American families, and why are they changing?
CASUG
FYSEM-UA 500
Spring 2018New Worlds of Work and CareWe live in a period of immense social change in the public world of work and the private world of family life. New technologies have blurred the boundary between home and work. New economic opportunities and pressures have sent women into the workplace. The rise of the "new economy“ has created jobs with more short-term flexibility, but less long-term security. And new options in intimate relationships have created more diverse and voluntary, but less predictable family ties. These intertwined shifts signal a social transformation that is reshaping the daily lives and life pathways of 21st century women and men. To explore the twin revolutions in work and care, the class will address several questions: What does an overview of changes in work, family, and gender patterns tell us about where we are now and where we are going? What are the major dilemmas and dislocations created by these changes, and how are people coping with these conflicts? What are the implications for the future? And what can we do to enhance the opportunities and limit the insecurities and inequalities of these new arrangements for women, men, and children?
CASUG
FYSEM-UA 536
Spring 2018Race and Culture in BrazilBrazil is often invoked in conversations about race and culture. Whether as an example of presumably more egalitarian race relations, or as a regional culture embodying an exceptional fusion of African, Indigenous, and European elements, Brazil is a model for understanding heterogeneity and difference. And yet it is also a nation frequently cited for its incidence of violence and extreme economic inequality. We explore some of the unique contradictions shaping Brazilian reality as related to notions of race and culture by tracing the history of race relations in the ongoing transformation of Brazilian culture, examining such key examples and events as slavery and the plantation economy, popular music, Carnival, populism, racial democracy, affirmative action, and urban and rural violence. How do race and culture coincide and diverge in Brazil? And what may we gather about these convergences and divergences from textual, musical, and cinematic examples?
CASUG
FYSEM-UA 678
Spring 2018Stuff of InequalityWe are the 99%! Black Lives Matter! These rallying cries bring inequality to the front-and-center of western political and media discourses. Yet a social system dividing the haves and have-nots is hardly a modern phenomenon. As a discipline dedicated both to the study of "stuff" and to the understanding of long-term cultural change, archaeology can make a unique contribution to these debates. This seminar considers injustice diachronically (i.e. over time) and on a global scale, examining ways in which the material world is created by and creates social divisions. Regular written assignments rely on the "stuff“ left behind to understand current protests, explore the physical dimensions of social unrest, point out examples of inequality on campus and across New York, and create alternate narratives of the groups often forgotten in historical accounts.
CASUG
HIST-UA 10
Spring 2018US Since 1865Course examines developments in U.S. society within a global historical context. Topics: urbanization; industrialization; immigration; American reform movements (populism, progressivism, the New Deal, and the War on Poverty); and foreign policy. Beginning with the post-Civil War expansion of the U.S. into the American West, the course traces U.S expansion and increasing global influence through the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, Cold War, Gulf Wars, and the War on Terror. Emphasizes broad themes and main changes in U.S. culture, politics, and society.
CASUGENVST-UA 480Spring 2018Environmental Justice & InequalityTraces the origins of the uneven distribution of environmental problems and hazards across various communities, examines ways to measure environmental inequality, and analyzes how environmental problems "both manmade and natural" reflect and exacerbate social inequality. Surveys the historical emergence of the environmental justice movement, led largely by impoverished urban nonwhites who felt excluded by mainstream environmentalism, and explores competing moral and political visions for achieving equal protection from environmental hazards. Readings span the fields of sociology, anthropology, philosophy, history, and politics. While most of the material centers on the American context, also examines the global dimensions of environmental inequality.
CASUG
CAMS-UA 152
Spring 2018Global Perspectives in Child and Adolescent Mental HealthChildren and adolescents suffer worldwide from significant mental health stressors, but how mental health and illness are perceived and addressed varies greatly around the world. The first part of the course will provide a brief overview of human rights, child development, social determinants of mental health, trauma and resilience, and the global public health significance of mental illness. Using this framework, the impact of selected salient cross-cultural factors affecting mental health (i.e. poverty, war and conflict, and gender-based exploitation) on children's development and wellbeing will be studied. Throughout the course, various perspectives will be considered, while dominant paradigms will be recognized and critically examined. Lastly, the course will conclude on a pragmatic level; deliberating specific settings, available resources, barriers, and preventative proposals. Selected case studies from the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East will be used to illustrate key concepts. Through lectures, readings, documentaries, and active discussion this course will provide an engaging forum to consider and debate child and adolescent mental health issues globally.
CASUGECON-UA 227Spring 2018Urban EconomicsThe city as an economic organization. Urbanization trends, functional specialization, and the nature of growth within the city; organization of economic activity within the city and its outlying areas, the organization of the labor market, and problems of urban poverty; the urban public economy; housing and land-use problems; transportation problems; and special problems within the public sector.
CASUGECON-UA 323Spring 2018Economic DevelopmentStudies the problem of economic underdevelopment, with special reference to the countries of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The building blocks of economic theory are used to understand the historical experiences of these countries. Macroeconomic topics covered include economic growth, income distribution, and poverty, with particular emphasis on the concept of underdevelopment as a circular, self-reinforcing trap. Microeconomic topics include the study of Prerequisites: V31.0010, V31.0012, and V31.0238, or V31.0011 and V31.0013. Studies the problem of economic underdevelopment, with special reference to the countries of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The building blocks of economic theory are used to understand the historical experiences of these countries. Macroeconomic topics covered include economic growth, income distribution, and poverty, with particular emphasis on the concept of underdevelopment as a circular, self-reinforcing trap. Microeconomic topics include the study of particular markets that are especially relevant to developing countries: those for land, labor, and credit. Notions of market fragmentation, limited information, and incentive problems receive emphasis. Ends with international issues: trading patterns, capital flows, and global financial crises are studied from the viewpoint of developing countries.
CASUGFYSEM-UA 682Spring 2018InfrastructureWe examine the multifaceted ways in which humans shape and are shaped by infrastructure, and how infrastructure provides not only the material but also the cultural foundations of everyday life. How does infrastructure both create and reproduce social and economic inequalities? How are various infrastructures shaped both from below and from the top down? We treat these themes and questions in a variety of case studies. On the level of geopolitics, the Suez Canal raises issues of global finance, national sovereignty, and decolonization. Likewise, the structures needed to produce different forms of energy give rise to different economic formations: coal mining requires a vast labor force (which thus has political leverage over management) whereas oil does not. A recent analysis of Pokemon Go's comparative absence from poorer neighborhoods is a starting point for addressing wider issues of inequality and the "digital divide." Other infrastructures are less spectacular but exert tremendous influence in daily life; these include sewers, street lighting, and street layouts, and have all been objects of political, economic, and social contestation in different times and places. Students complete a fieldwork assignment to think spatially in their examination of some part of New York City's infrastructure.
GALLATINGRAD
ELEC-GG 2719
Spring 2018Communities And/Of Justice
ELEC-GG 2719 Communities And/Of Justice
This course explores scholarly debates about communities and justice. Course material covers longstanding themes such as state-society relations, democracy and political participation, emergence of political identities, grassroots and netroots, community organizing and urban governance, and social movements. Students will acquire critical literacy in social studies, including the bodies of literature mentioned above that draw on anthropology, political theory, geography and sociology. These insights should be able to inform students' further critical engagement in the world. Particular attention will be paid to 1) how political problems both reflect and help constitute social practices, identities and inequalities, and 2) how this complex relationship between the social and the political is manifested on a variety of levels, from global networks and nation-states to cities, regions and local neighborhoods.
GALLATINUG
IDSEM-UG 1959
Spring 2018Sports, Race and PoliticsBeyond spectacular touchdowns and walk-off grand slams, sport remains a vital institution for analyzing the ideological/theoretical frameworks of nationalism, diplomacy, economic development, corruption, gender and race. From Joe Louis's historic fight against Max Schmeling in June 1936 to the role of FIFA's World Cup played in South Africa's structural development, sport should be understood beyond masculine bravado, violence and the joy and agony of competition, but also as a serious vehicle for conceptualizing and analyzing the triumphs and limitations of our society and its complicated history. In what ways does sports reify concepts of race and gender? How is it utilized as a tool of challenging domestic inequalities and/or improving international relations? This course examines sports within the Americas, Western Europe and an African context during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will read key texts in the field of the sport studies that illuminate the significance of sport in shaping culture and politics in our global society.
GALLATINUG
IDSEM-UG 1580
Spring 2018Between Rights and Justice in Latin AmericaWhat is the relationship between human rights and social justice? Do both always operate in conjunction? Are they ever mutually exclusiveÑone sacrificed at the expense of the other? This course explores key questions around the theory and practice of human rights promotion, surveying specialized literature and founding documents to consider the promise and challenge of existing human rights frameworks as they work for, but sometimes clash with, the promotion of social justice. We ask, are there universal rights? If so, how are these defined, and by whom? What is the relationship between "political" and "human" rights, between individual and collective rights? Can human rights be in conflict, and if so, how are such conflicts to be resolved? In regions rife with inequalityÑpolitical, social, and economicÑis promoting a global human rights agenda unrealistic, or more necessary than ever? After exploring these general questions, we will focus on Latin America, in particular on Argentina, Guatemala, Chile, Bolivia, Colombia, and Mexico. How do human rights struggles in these countries change our view of the prevailing human rights regime? How do legacies of colonialism in these countries affect both the protection and violation of human rights in the present? Do these countries reveal a political tension between social justice and human rights? Readings will draw from BartolomŽ de las Casas, Immanuel Kant, John Rawls, Martha Nussbaum, Ariel Dorfman, Paul Farmer, and Greg Grandin, among others.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1866Spring 2018Poetry and the Politics of DecolonizationThe course looks at poets writing in the twentieth century and after whose work is concerned with liberation from colonial rule and, subsequently, with the formation of a post-colonial literary voice. Poetry in the period of decolonization deals with issues of national, racial, and gender identity, place and displacement, and freedom from linguistic and political oppression. We will read, among others, poets from the Indian Subcontinent and Middle East such as Tagore, Iqbal, Faiz and Darwish; two leading poets of nŽgritude, AimŽ CŽsaire and LŽopold Senghor, in relation to movements in Caribbean, African, and American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present (Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Nicolas GuillŽn, and Derek Walcott); Latin American poets including Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, and Octavio Paz; and English-language poets including W.B. Yeats, William Carlos Williams, and more contemporary movements in poetry. Using theory and historical background, we will look at the work of each poet comparatively in the context of international development and political change. The course offers an approach to globalization through literature; since this process has touched so much of the world, we are open to works from other literatures that students propose.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1945Spring 2018Law and Social Change: Race and the Politics of PropertyThis two-unit course studies the discourses, practices and institutions activated by legal strategies for social change, with a particular focus on the terrain of property rights. From ownership of humans to ownership of land, from redlining to squatterÕs rights, from homelessness to gentrification, property has been a central terrain for social justice struggles. In Coetzee's novel, Waiting for the Barbarians, the magistrate says that "All creatures come into the world bringing with them the memory of justice. But we live in a world of laws." We will focus on that relationship between justice and law in unpacking the legal architecture of property in America as it has moved from slavery and colonization to contemporary struggles regarding housing security. Are we inextricably tethered to a 'possessive, individualistÕ conception of property rights or can we imagine alternative approaches to property rights that ÔrememberÕ justice, nurture solidarities and challenge the housing vulnerabilities of subaltern communities? Can law produce unjust outcomes and yet appear legitimate? How does law help or hinder the reproduction of inequality? Can law be a vehicle for transformative social change? What are the challenges confronted by legal advocacy of the homeless, of renters and others facing housing precarity? How do different understandings of gender impact claims for property ownership? Through discussion of property law cases addressing injustices anchored in race and class, we will examine different understandings of the potential tensions and affinities between the rule of law and systematic injustices.
GALLATINUG
FIRST-UG 782
Spring 2018First-Year Research Seminar: The American Welfare StateHow has American society defined and dealt with poverty? Should "the poor" be forced to work, be objects of pity, have the right to basic necessities? And what does it mean to designate a human beings as "poor" in the first place? Americans have debated these questions for generations, and indeed debates about welfare policy remain central to contemporary politics. Our answers implicate not only our society's treatment of those who live below the poverty line, but broader questions of American identity and of the governmentÕs role in the lives of citizens. In this research seminar, we will examine the history of social welfare and government benefits in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Chronologically, we will devote half the term to the second half of the 20th century, and we will learn about the development of the peculiarly American private welfare system and the welfare rights movement. We will pay special attention to the positions and subjectivities of reformers, bureaucrats, social workers, and aid recipients. In other words, we will ask how reformers, social workers, and welfare recipients have related to each other, how their relative positions in society have influenced how they have acted, and what the power relationships have been among them. We will read books by Michael Katz and Annelise Orleck. Students will write their own histories of welfare, using archival documents and secondary sources.
GALLATINUGFIRST-UG 791Spring 2018First-Year Research Seminar: American Dream(s):Self, Stuff, Status & Social MobilityFaith in the notion that one may attain success and virtue through hard work is a dominant ideology in American life. We exalt those who Òpull themselves up by their bootstrapsÓ and repeatedly tell of that ancestor who Òcame here with a dollar in his pocketÓ and achieved wealth. This ÒAmerican DreamÓ promises self-fulfillment, material comfort, and, importantly, social mobility-- surpassing oneÕs parents in status and socioeconomic standing. Yet, realizing the American Dream has always been more difficult for some than others, and a deep skepticism of its possibility has always been part of US political discourse. As inequality has soared in recent years (by some accounts, youÕre more likely to live the American Dream inÉCanada), that skepticism has moved to the center of political and social debates. This course considers the status of the American Dream as cultural concept and social reality. To what extent do concerns of the self, stuff, status and social mobility animate AmericansÕ notions of the good life? We ask whether an American Dream predicated on social mobility was, is, and will be achievable--and for whom. We explore ways that ideas of the good life are changing in a post-Great Recession context and in the face of ecological limits. We pay particular attention to authorsÕ theoretical starting points, methods, and interpretation of evidence in order to develop analytical reasoning skill. Reading includes works of sociology, political science, economics, literature, and social commentary.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHUGUGPH-GU 25Spring 2018Public Health EthicsThis course provides a survey of contemporary issues in Public Health Ethics. Students will be introduced to a variety of ethical issues and cases concerning public health, both globally and domestically. Much of the course will focus on how the pursuit and promotion of public health can come into conflict with individual autonomy, privacy, and social justice, and on how to think about the relation of health to human welfare more broadly. Topics include the nature of health and well-being, the right to health care, obesity prevention, tobacco control, infectious disease control (such as Ebola and Zika), childhood vaccination efforts, breastfeeding promotion, public health messaging, health inequalities and marginalized populations, global public health and resource allocation, and global health justice.
GSASGRAD
LATC-GA 2001
Spring 2018Intro Lat Am & Carib II: Hemispheric & PostcolPart II of the required Introductory course sequence begins with the independence era, and treats the emergence of a Hemispheric axis for LatiPart II of the required Introductory course sequence begins with the independence era, and treats the emergence of a Hemispheric axis for Latin America and the Caribbean, in which the emergence of a multiplicity of nation states, and relations with the United States, loom large, supplanted somewhat in the 21st century by renewed connections (foreign aid, investment, and a heavy flow of migrants) between Spain, France, and Holland, and their former colonies. Students learn about contending paradigms of sovereignty, patrimony, liberalism, citizenship, and development. The course examines the development of democratic national government and periodic authoritarian rule, as well as social violence, foreign military intervention, and civil war. The course also treats continuing problems of inequality, and the impact of pressure by other countries and international organizations on political and economic arrangements in the region. Alongside of such issues, students are introduced to expressive culture and the arts, to competing paradigms of formal and commemorative memory and history, and to the emergence of tourism and the UNESCO-associated ?culture industry?. The course ends with in-depth analysis of the impact of globalization, neoliberal policies, emerging social movements, increased political participation and decentralization of governance, and the rise of populist governments. Throughout the course, students work closely with instructors to develop a scholarly genealogy of key concepts and processes within which they will be able to frame the themes and methods of their Master?s Projects.
LIBERAL STUDIESUGCAGC-UF 101Spring 2018Caribbean CulturesIslands in the Caribbean archipelago have been variously characterized as paradisical, the sites of wealth-producing plantations, the ideal Spring Break destination, even as staging posts for narcotics traders. Caribbean landscapes function as metaphor, emblem, symbol, or even characters. Landscape Ð and geography - is implicated in the ways the identities of Caribbean states have been influenced by an accumulation of images, cultivated primarily by non-Caribbean individuals and agencies, including Columbus' journal entries, the documentation of European colonial governments and settlers, the brochures travel agents and the fantasies of tourists. Often in conflict with the fantasy projections of others, Caribbean peoples face the ongoing challenge of reclaiming their islands and building their societies, still haunted by histories of slavery and colonialism, while still subjected to multiple forms of commodification, consumption and economic domination. Based on readings from literature, history and cultural studies, this course takes an interdisciplinary, transnational approach to unpacking connections between the histories of slavery, indentureship and European colonialism and the Caribbean's current realities of inequality, internally Ð in particular inequalities of race and gender - and in its economic relations with the West. Questions addressed include: How have the residual legacies of slavery and colonization facilitated consumption in and of the Caribbean? And what cultural resources and strengths are deployed or lost to migration?
NURSINGUGNURSE-UN 1244Spring 2018Community Health Nursing45 hours lecture plus clinical. 6 credits. This course focuses on understanding and applying the theoretical principles of and evidence base for public health nursing to culturally competent, community health nursing practice and professional role development. The focus of community health nursing practice is on protecting and enhancing the health of communities and humanly diverse populations, including those at risk and those challenged by health disparities, developmental needs, and mental health concerns and for clients living with poverty. Emphasis is placed on health promotion, health care policy, and ethics.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESGRAD
GLOB1-GC 1000
Spring 2018International Relations in The Post-Cold War EraThe demise of the Soviet Union and its empire, the legacy of colonialism, resurgent nationalism and new non-state actors have given rise to a period of complexity and rapid change in international relations. The academic debate reflects this uncertainty, with contending theories about what constitutes power in the post cold war environment, how to identify the basic units of international affairs, the nature of globalization, the utility and legitimacy of the use of force, the dynamics of the balance of power, the nature of threats to peace and stability, and the role of international institutions. This course will examine alternative theories and frameworks for understanding post cold war developments, and test these theories against emergent reality. How, for example, do these contending theories explain the origins and consequences of terrorism and other global threats? What importance do they assign to the persistence of poverty and global inequality; to internal ethno/religious conflict and political instability; to 'globalization and its discontents'? How do these theories assess the potential and implications of renewed great power conflict? How do they address the problem of U.S. hegemony and the reaction of others (states and non-states) to this new reality?
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESGRADGLOB1-GC 1100Spring 2018Inside Latin AmericaLatin American regional democracies confront myriad challenges, from U.S. military intervention in Colombia to populism in Venezuela and renewed demands for military accountability in the southern cone. Recent market-oriented policies and globalization have generated economic growth and tamed inflation at the cost of income inequality, environmental stresses, and vulnerability to foreign shocks. University strikes in Mexico, a landless movement in Brazil, and labor organizers on the U.S.-Mexican border challenge the neo-liberal agenda. This class explores key regional trends with a focus on Mexico, Chile, Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESGRAD
GLOB1-GC 2440
Spring 2018Sustainable DevelopmentOne of the most famous definitions of sustainable development is that it 'seeks to meet the needs of the present world without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.' - Brundtland Commission. This course introduces students to the concept of sustainable development, which combines concern for economic progress and the elimination of poverty with awareness of environmental limits. We explore in depth such issues as wealth and poverty, population growth, political economy of food and hunger, the extinction of species, global warming and climatic change, ozone depletion, energy conservation, deforestation, and misuse of technology. We seek to integrate debates about globalization and sustainability by examining the nature of development, the impact of globalization on environment and quality of life, and the role of global and national actors and institutions in either creating sustainability or moving further away from it.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESGRAD
GLOB1-GC 3040
Spring 2018The Two Worlds of India: Poverty and the Economic Rise of 'New India'Over the past two decades, India has undertaken a series of economic reforms that have spurred to a period of unprecedented economic growth; growth rates averaging 3-6 percent in the years 1975-90 have doubled during the first decade of the new millennium. Driven by the ICT and service sectors, India has become the 4th largest economy in the world (based on ppp) and is frequently referred to as an emerging global power. Yet despite the economic growth of the past 20 years the number of people living in urban slum has increased by more than 20 percent over the past decade and according to the Multi-Dimensional Poverty Index 645 million Indians lived below the poverty line in 2010. Recent estimates by the Indian government based on the daily cost of calories in urban and rural areas suggest that nearly 40% of the Indian population, or 380 million people, live in hunger.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESGRAD
GLOB1-GC 2146
Spring 2018Beyond GDP: New Metrics for a Global EconomyAmid globalization, traditional economic measures like Gross Domestic Product (GDP), unemployment, and stock markets leave governments and citizens with a distorted worldview - and a shaky foundation for policy decisions. In the Information Age, aren't there better indicators to manage our country's well-being? This course investigates problems with conventional statistics used for assessing national output, unemployment, inflation, productivity, and trade, among others. Many conventional statistics for crafting public policies have unintended consequences that have led to financial meltdowns, environmental degradation, and economic inequality, among others negative externalities.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUG
TCHT1-UC 3490
Spring 2018Special Interest TourismAn analysis of the issues involved in developing destinations and tourism products that are sensitive to the natural and cultural resources of the area. Topics to be covered include: sustainable development; rural tourism; poverty tourism; heritage and cultural tourism; adventure tourism; and urban tourism.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUGANTH1-UC 5003Spring 2018Cultural AnthropologyThis course is an introduction to the basic concepts, aims, and findings of cultural anthropology. In addition to exploring the concept of culture as a defining characteristic of human experience, the course analyzes the forces that shape and define such human cultural features as family systems and marriage, sex and gender roles, political and economic institutions, social inequalities and ethnic identities, and religious and ritual behavior. Using a variety of ethnographic examples, the course explores the similarities and differences of peoples and cultures around the world.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUGECON1-UC 356Spring 2018Transition EconomicsThis course offers students a critical evaluation of the transformation of the economies of the former socialist Eastern Europe countries and the former Soviet Union from a multifaceted approach. Insights about development economics, especially the relationship between government and market outcomes, are discussed. The class analyzes the socialist economic blueprint, market liberalization reforms, and the current economic outlook. Topics of discussion include issues of limited industrial diversification; increasing financialization; healthcare and education reforms; and problems of poverty, inequality, and outward migration. Central are questions of state/private balance in social transformation and overall macroeconomic dynamics.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUG
SOCY1-UC 7250
Spring 2018Inequality in SocietyThis course is an in-depth introduction to the key sociological categories of race, class, and gender. The course explores the classical and contemporary theories of social stratification and inequality as well as contemporary trends in the distribution of wealth, income, and education in the U.S. It addresses the social and historical construction of race and ethnicity, gender roles, and class categorical differences.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUG
ECON1-UC 371
Spring 2018Labor EconomicsThis course begins by developing theories of individual labor supply and the demand for labor across firms and industries. Theories of earnings determination are presented to explore the importance of experience, mobility, and human capital in explaining earnings growth. Income assistance programs and training initiatives are examined in detail. Additional topics include the cause and consequences of earnings inequality, theories of discrimination, immigration, and incentive-based compensation.
SHANGHAIUGENGL-SHU 101M EAPSpring 2018Global Citizenship: On becoming a change agent in the 21st CenturyThis 101-level English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course is designed to help you continue to develop the high-level language, communication, and critical thinking skills you need to be successful in an English-speaking university. At the 101 level students are encouraged to gain mastery over facilitation of group discussions as well as the other academic communicative skills introduced at the 100-level. It is hoped that these skills can also be transferred to future professional and personal lives. As in the 100-level course, the thematic, content-based EAP seminar, aims to help you cultivate an interest in issues that cross disciplines, an important part of a well-rounded, liberal arts education. Specifically, this course will explore the concept of global citizenship, what may be some distinguishing features of this period of human history, and what some implications may be for individuals wishing to be responsible global citizens at this time. To take on this vast topic within the limits of a one-semester course, we will briefly touch on such global issues as poverty & socio-economic development, environment crisis, human rights & social inequalities, and the persistence of violent conflicts. We will examine the systemic interconnections and causes of these challenges and consider what kinds of actions conscientious global citizens can take, individually and in groups organized at the grass roots, to address these problems and promote positive social change in an increasingly globalized and interconnected world.
SHANGHAIUGHIST-SHU 110Spring 2018U.S. History through Literature and FilmThis survey of U.S. History since the Civil War examines the development of American Culture and its expansion into the global economy. Topics include: urbanization; industrialization; immigration; reform movements (populism, progressivism, the New Deal, and the War on Poverty); and foreign policy. Beginning with the post-Civil War expansion of the U.S. into the American West, the course traces the U.S.Õs increasing global influence through the early 21st Century. Using film, TV, literature and popular culture, the course emphasizes broad themes and changes in U.S. culture, politics, and society. Prerequisites: None.
SHANGHAIUG
SOCS-SHU 426
Spring 2018Poverty and Inequality Around the GlobeThis seminar examines the causes and consequences of poverty and rising inequality around the globe. Students will study the ways in which poverty and inequality are shaped by multifaceted contexts; understand the theories underlying strategies and programs which address key poverty and inequality issues faced by many developed, developing and least developed countries; and learn about different countries' experiences addressing their own poverty and inequality issues. We consider philosophies of global justice and the ethics of global citizenship, and students are expected to critically reflect upon their own engagements with poverty relief activities and aspirations for social changes. Students should be prepared to tackle advanced social science readings, analysis, and writing. Open to seniors, and to other students with instructorÕs permission. There are no prerequisites for the class although students should be prepared to tackle advanced social science readings and analysis.
STEINHARDTGRADARTT-GE 2170Spring 2018Clinical Interventions for Specialized PopulationsCulturally attuned interventions consider the sociocultural, psychological & developmental factors in treatment. Current research for clients struggling with addictions & those involved in judicial proceedings will be shared. Communities impacted by social injustices & art therapy methodology to effectively, legally & ethically serve these specialized populations will be discussed. Engaging clients to address trauma & violence needs a broad lens that also includes issues of societal inequality. Guest lectures will supplement course learning.
STEINHARDTGRADEDPLY-GE 2030Spring 2018Education and Social PolicyCourse is designed to introduce students to public policy & provide a foundation for understanding & assessing education policies in particular. Students will examine the theoretical perspectives in policy as well as examine the policy process & the institutions under which policies are formed, specifically the difference between market systems & the role of government. Fourth, the methods & tools for policy analysis, both before & after policies are implemented will be studied. Finally, students will examine the role of institutions as well as policy design. Topics may include No Child Left Behind, financial aid for higher education, tax reforms to encourage saving for college, school reform in major cities, poverty & inequality, among others.
STEINHARDTGRAD
FOOD-GE 2286
Spring 2018Adv Topics Food Systems: Inequality & Food SystemsThis course examines the role of U.S. food & agricultural policy in perpetuating racial & economic inequality. Topics include agriculture, class & race in the 19th century; farm size & inequality; farm labor; low-wage workers in the food chain; food insecurity; & environmental inequality. The class covers both historical & contemporary social movements that respond to inequities within the food system. By introducing students to historical documents, empirical research, & the academic literature on these & related topics, the course prepares students to effectively evaluate contemporary legal & policy responses to food systems inequality.
STEINHARDTGRADHPSE-GE 2017Spring 2018Inequality in the Pathway to American Higher EducationThis course is designed to explore the role of the K-12 educational sector on college completion. The course will consider factors such as a changing demography, segregation, & the role of early, middle, & high school interventions on postsecondary success. The course will also examine theoretical frameworks from sociology & economics to understand how student experiences in the early part of the educational continuum may have implications for longer-term educational outcomes for various student groups in the U.S.
STEINHARDTGRAD
SOED-GE 2373
Spring 2018Gender and Inequality: The Role of SchoolsThis course will cover issues concerning gender & inequality in education from early childhood to post-secondary education including professional schools with an emphasis on what happens to the success of girls in the elementary & secondary school settings once they enter post-secondary & graduate/professional education as well as the workforce. As there are limited opportunities to foreground gender in this manner, this course will be focused on it. The topics include how schools have historically shortchanged female students even after mass coeducation in the United States in the 1960s & 1970s & the passage of Title IX; single-sex education for females & for males at the primary, secondary & post-secondary levels; the differences between coeducation & mixed-sex education; legal issues & gender equality in education; & how gender, race & class come together in schools.
STEINHARDTGRAD
INTE-GE 2545
Spring 2018Immigration and Education in the WorldContemporary (im)migration is a global phenomenon that shapes populations and nations of inequality. Each semester will focus on a different national context of schooling and education. This course serves as an introduction to different theoretical and empirical scholarship on the role of education in the social adaptation on (im)migrants, and how race/ethnicity, social class,and gender matter.
STEINHARDTGRADHPSE-GE 2016Spring 2018Social Justice on The College CampusThis course will cover the origins of social justice theory & its current-day relevance for higher education educators & practitioners. Students will explore models of oppression & empowerment & learn to infuse social justice frameworks into curricular & extracurricular programming.
STEINHARDTGRADARTT-GE 2170Spring 2018Clinical Interventions for Specialized PopulationsCulturally attuned interventions consider the sociocultural, psychological & developmental factors in treatment. Current research for clients struggling with addictions & those involved in judicial proceedings will be shared. Communities impacted by social injustices & art therapy methodology to effectively, legally & ethically serve these specialized populations will be discussed. Engaging clients to address trauma & violence needs a broad lens that also includes issues of societal inequality. Guest lectures will supplement course learning.
STEINHARDTGRAD
SOED-GE 2371
Spring 2018Social Inequality & EducConsideration of the role of educational institutions in fostering, preventing, and maintaining equalities and inequalities in American society.
STEINHARDTUGAPSY-UE 1110Spring 2018Sexual Identities Across The LifespanExamines concepts associated with sexual orientation, gender identity and LGBTQA+ development and discusses interventions to support LGBTQA+ individuals across the lifespan. Explores various health and mental health issues, including issues around oppression, intersectionality, discrimination and heteronormativity, as well as LGBTQA+ history, advocacy and culture.
STEINHARDTUG
TCHL-UE 1081
Spring 2018Research and Policy for Children in the US and UKCourse focuses on how research informs policy for children and families in the US and the UK. The course will include topics such as poverty, welfare reform, child care, assessment, literacy instruction, education for language minorities, and intervention programs. What is the history of policy in the US and UK? What research findings are relevant in formulating or evaluating the policy? When does research shape policy? What further research is needed to inform future policies addressing these issues?
STEINHARDTUG
TCHL-UE 41
Spring 2018American Dilemmas: Race, Inequality, and the UnfulfilledThis course provides students with background on the historical & sociological foundation of education in the United States. It examines the role that education has played in advancing civil & human rights I it explores the ways in which education continues to be implicated in the maintenance of social inequality in American society. Through readings, lectures, films & class debates, students will gain an understanding of some of the most complex & controversial issues confronting education today including: affirmative action, Bi-Lingual Education, Special Education, the achievement gap, school choice & vouchers, & the role of race & culture in student achievement.
SILVERGRAD
MSWAC-GS 2019
Spring 2018Advanced Social Policy: Immigration and RefugeesThe course explores policy dynamics, patterns, and changes through a closer look at history, theories, frameworks, ethical issues, forces of oppression and the paths to social, economic, and political justice relevant to a special population. We will discuss current issues and policies related to immigrants and refugees in global comparative perspective, with necessary historical overview and with focus on the U.S. immigration. Specifically, we will discuss issues and relevant policies of changing migration flows, expanding ethnic and economic diversity of immigrants, immigrant women, unauthorized immigrants, transnationalism and development, new approaches to assimilation, and second generation/children of immigrants.
SILVERGRADMSWEL-GS 2096Spring 2018Cultural Competentency Practicum with Urban Youth and FamiliesThis course provides students with an opportunity to develop engagement, assessment and intervention skills in individual, family, and group work with urban youth (aged 11-21). TThis course provides students with an opportunity to develop engagement, assessment and intervention skills in individual, family, and group work with urban youth (aged 11-21). The course will focus on practice within a wide range of government and agency-based settings, including: prevention, school, mental health, foster care, criminal justice and residential programs. Attention will be given to the development of skills that foster interdisciplinary collaboration within and between urban systems of care. There will be a focus on understanding the ways in which racism and other forms of oppression can impact both adolescent development and social service delivery systems.
SILVERGRADMSWEL-GS 2197Spring 2018Advocacy and Social Justice in Social Work PracticeAdvocacy and the pursuit of social justice have long been core values of the social work profession. The NASW's Code of Ethics stipulates that social workers challenge social injustice as one of its six Ethical Principles. Advocacy, as a set of actions taken to achieve social justice for individuals, communities or systems, is a professional mandate and the cornerstone upon which social work is built. This course seeks to prepare students to engage in advocacy practice oriented towards social justice. Students will receive an overview of the historical roots of advocacy in the social work profession and the role of structural racism, oppression, and marginalization in contemporary social injustices. Students will also learn how to apply Hoefer's (2016) Unified Model of Advocacy Practice in their work with clients or communities.
SILVERGRADMSWPF-GS 2001Spring 2018Social Work Practice IThe overall objective of this course is to provide students with an integrative framework that combines direct practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities with a commitment to organizational and social change. Students are helped to develop skills in a broad range of practitioner roles. The course examines the history, values, and ethics of the profession; the societal and organizational context of practice; and the impact of racism and oppression. Skills in systems assessment, engagement, interviewing, collaboration and advocacy, relationship issues and self-awareness, and the practice principles of both crisis and extended intervention are taught. A social work laboratory component provides students with opportunities for experiential learning.
SILVERGRADDSWSW-GS 4022Spring 2018Power, Privilege, and Oppression in Clinical Social WorkThis course will examine the role power, privilege, and oppression play in clinical social work practice and education. Grounded in theories of critical consciousness, critical race theory, and anti-oppression, this course will engage students in a close examination of topics related to white supremacy, equity and inclusion, and social action. Particular attention will be paid to the current US and global sociopolitical climate. This course aims to prepare students to be critically aware leaders in the field, educators in the classroom, and lifelong learners around matters of power, privilege, and oppression.
SILVERGRADMSWPF-GS 2010Spring 2018Diversity, Racism, Oppression and PrivilegeThis course centers on expanding the student's understanding of the meaning of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and culture, as well as the concepts of prejudice, discrimination, oppression, stigma, and stereotyping. Racism, particularly as it impacts on personal, professional, institutional, and societal levels, is studied. Special attention is given to the experiences of African Americans and Latinos in U.S. society in general and in the New York City metropolitan area in particular. Within an integrative perspective, implications for direct and indirect social work practice are explored. Specifically, the importance of ethnoculturally competent practice for the individual worker and the design of service delivery systems are covered.
SILVERGRAD
UNDSW-US 84
Spring 2018Social Justice, Advocacy and Social MediaSocial justice advocacy, to influence public policy and create systemic change, has evolved due to technological innovation. What in the 1960s and 1970s were protests in the streets has in the 21st Century turned into ÒlikingÓ on FaceBook and following on Instagram and Twitter. This course examines how advocacy has changed over time with social media and how social media can be used as a tool to advocate for social justice and political change. We will pay special attention to oppression, power, and privilege and how this is manifested via social media. Case studies, theoretical readings, and activist literature will be used to understand how and which groups have successfully used media to advocate for social justice. Understanding the limitations, dangers, and access issues will be of paramount importance in analyzing how groups can use media advocacy in the future.
SILVERGRAD
MSWPF-GS 2006
Spring 2018Human Behavior in The Social Environment IThis course is centered in the biopsychosocial perspective that stresses a multidimensional view of human development and behavior. The focus is on the transactional relationship between human behavior and pertinent psychological, social, biological, economic, cultural, environmental, and institutional forces. Multiple theoretical perspectives are used to understand the behavior of individuals, families, groups, social networks, and systems. The role of social stressors such as poverty and oppression and their impact on human development are evaluated. All aspects of development and behavior are studied in the context of diversity. The life cycle stages of infancy and childhood are also viewed from a biopsychosocial perspective.
SILVERGRAD
MSWEL-GS 2010
Spring 2018Clinical Practice With ChildrenThis course helps students to develop the knowledge and skills essential to working with children in a variety of settings. Drawing on contemporary theories of child development and research, the course focuses on assessment; goal setting; the use of individual, family, and group modalities; interventive principles and techniques; advocacy; and mobilization of resources. The impact of poverty and oppression is emphasized. Special consideration is given to students' case presentations and child welfare case vignettes.
SILVERGRAD
MSWEL-GS 3061
Spring 2018Healthy LivingThis course focuses on the understanding and application of the theoretical principles and evidence base of public and community health nursing practice and culturally competent care. In this course, the unique health needs of women, civilian and veterans, in underserved communities and how associated factors with living in poverty-impacted underserved communities impact health. The focus of community health is on protecting and enhancing the health of communities and diverse populations, including those at risk and those challenged by health disparities, developmental needs, mental health concerns, and clients living with poverty. Emphasis is placed on health promotion and education, health care policy and ethics/social justice.
SILVERGRAD
PHDSW-GS 3059
Spring 2018Seminar on Social Policy History and AnalysisThis course is required for all PhD students. It is designed to expose students to some of the major cross-cutting themes in the United States social policy today (e.g., poverty and inequality, universalism and selectivity) and to a selected group from among those currently on the public agenda (e.g., the working poor, immigrants). The overarching goals of this course are that students learn about the major social policies and programs that affect people's well-being or quality of life and various aspects of social service delivery; understand the ways in which direct social work practice enacts social policies and is shaped by them; and develop expertise in understanding social policy content, policy actions of agencies, professional associations, and political bodies, and the skills needed to influence social policy. This course emphasizes the roles that social issues, values, power, politics, the economy, discrimination, and advocacy play in the dynamic policy making and implementation environment. This course thus provides students with the policy related competencies and practice skills for conducting research-informed policy analysis and advocating for policy change. In particular, through lecture and discussion this course will explicitly use issues relating to poverty, inequality, and opportunity with special, but not exclusive, emphasis on these phenomena in American society as an example to illustrate social policy analysis. The course will examine theoretical principles of social policy, US social policy history, poverty and inequality, the causes of poverty and inequality, major social program through policy analysis perspectives, and public policies designed to reduce poverty and inequality and promote opportunity. The course assumes some prior background in social policy. Students without this background will be expected to do some supplementary reading. The course reading list provides ample opportunity for students to "fill in" their basic social policy knowledge and enrich their background in areas of special interest.
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 86Spring 2018Ending PovertyThis course examines the social, economic, and political dimensions of poverty and inequality in the United States. The course will offer a critical analysis of poverty and inequality with an analytic and descriptive focus on competing theories examining the causes of poverty, the role of policy, and socioeconomic dimensions of stratification, including race, ethnicity, class, gender, immigration status, and other factors. In this course, we will examine the existing and emerging policy issues related to ending poverty. Those policy issues include, although may not be limited to: 1.) Education and Human Capital Development; 2.) Health, Health Care, and Mental Health; 3.) Wealth and Asset Development; 4.) Housing and Community Development; 5.) Work and Employment; and 6.) Family and Social Structures. International perspectives may also be considered.
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 68Spring 2018Service Learning Through Community EngagementThis course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity on the Lower East Side. Students will provide tutoring for K-12 youth and/or adult learners from disadvantaged backgrounds at the University Settlement House. The accompanying course will offer broad and general content related to students' service experiences. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experiences.
SILVERUG
UNDSW-US 72
Spring 2018Service Learning with Immigrant YouthThis weekly one-hour course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity with refugees. Emphasis will be placed on students. understanding of the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. Students will learn about immigration and resettling refugees. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experience. As part of their community service they will provide academic coaching and mentoring for refugees from such nations as Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Burma, Moldova, Uganda, and Sudan for a minimum of two hours weekly at Brooklyn International High School (Tuesdays or Wednesdays from 2:30pm to 4:30pm).
STERNUGBSPA-UB 26Spring 2018 Conceptual Foundations of Business and SocietyGoing back to Adam Smith's seminal and underappreciated work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, the study of economics originally began as an offshoot of moral and political philosophy. Today, economics majors can be forgiven if they think they are majoring in applied mathematics. Smith even warned against an overreliance on the social science aspects of economics in his Theory when he wrote, “[The economist] seems to imagine that he can arrange the different members of a great society with as much ease as the hand arranges the different pieces upon a chess-board.” This course differs from Stern’s other economics offerings by assessing economists’ theories and proposals from qualitative, moral, and philosophical perspectives. After reading some of the important texts in economics and business, and wrestling with them in a Socratic-style seminar, students will test and critique some of the best that has been thought and written in the field. Topics will include the relationship between man and the state, income inequality, conceptions of equity as seen from both the left and the right, the assumptions underlying “rational” decision-making, morality, and the outsized role of finance in today global economy.
STERNUGBSPA-UB 43Spring 2018Economic Inequality: Perspectives & PracticesThis course invites students to consider the causes and consequences of economic inequality from a variety of perspectives, to judge the situation based on their own ethical values, and to take concrete actions to bring about positive change in the world. The course format integrates a discussion seminar with two major research projects. In the seminar context, students become familiar with relevant terms and concepts drawn from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology, organizational studies and philosophy. Informed by these multiple analytic perspectives, students undertake two major research projects. The first individual project focuses on the causes and consequences of inequality in the contexts of the students’ own hometowns. The second group project focuses on possible points of leverage with the market, government and community sectors, and encourages students to use these points of leverage to bring about a more just society. These projects will allow the students to become more familiar with the complexity of economic inequality as an empirical phenomenon, and more empowered to contribute pragmatically to a just society.
STERNUGBSPA-UB 43Spring 2018Economic Inequality: Perspectives & PracticesThis course invites students to consider the causes and consequences of economic inequality from a variety of perspectives, to judge the situation based on their own ethical values, and to take concrete actions to bring about positive change in the world. The course format integrates a discussion seminar with two major research projects. In the seminar context, students become familiar with relevant terms and concepts drawn from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology, organizational studies and philosophy. Informed by these multiple analytic perspectives, students undertake two major research projects. The first individual project focuses on the causes and consequences of inequality in the contexts of the studentsÕ own hometowns. The second group project focuses on possible points of leverage with the market, government and community sectors, and encourages students to use these points of leverage to bring about a more just society. These projects will allow the students to become more familiar with the complexity of economic inequality as an empirical phenomenon, and more empowered to contribute pragmatically to a just society.
WAGNERGRADPADM-GP 2445Spring 2018Poverty, Inequality, and PolicyThis course examines the nature and extent of poverty primarily in the U.S. but with a comparative perspective (developed countries in Europe). To start, this course will focus on how poverty is defined and measured. It will proceed to explore how conceptions of poverty are socially constructed and historically bounded; examine what the causes and consequences of poverty are and discuss how these are complex and interwoven; and show how people can experience poverty at different points in their life courseÑsome groups experiencing poverty more so than others. This course will discuss the role of labor markets, family structure and social organization in shaping poverty. And finally, it will explore how social policies seek to ameliorate poverty and other forms of social disadvantage throughout the life course. But when thinking about how ÔsuccessfulÕ social policies are at alleviating poverty, this course will demonstrate that ÔsuccessÕ is actually influenced by the conceptions of poverty adopted by policymakers in the first place.
WAGNERGRADPADM-GP 2202Spring 2018Politics of International DevelopmentThis course provides students with a rich sense of the institutional and political context within which policy is made and implemented. The course aims to give students exposure to important ongoing debates in international development and their historical context. The class will provide an overview of some of the major contemporary analytical and policy debates regarding the politics of development. Topics to be covered are: States, Regimes and Industrialization; Politics of Poverty, Growth and Policy Reform; Governance, Civil Society and Development; and The Politics of Development in the Age of Globalization.
WAGNERGRADUPADM-GP 219Spring 2018Race, Class, & Gender in American Cities This interdisciplinary course examines the social construction of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in the American city. We will analyze through an intersectional lens the strategies, tools and public policies that impact marginalized groups. Our study will include the analysis of the role of both electoral and institutional politics. Further, through the analysis of precarity -- the condition of existence without predictability or security, affecting the material and psychological welfare of marginalized groups in our society -- we will examine the social class which has been defined by the term "the precariat". Specifically, the condition of those experiencing a lack of quality education, access to mainstream opportunities, intermittent or underemployment and the resultant precarious existence. This course has been designed to underscore the necessity of intersectionality as an essential tool for deciphering the characteristics of oppressive institutional power and existing ill conceived public policy. We will analyze intersectionality as a multidimensional justice orientation and counter-hegemonic tool to be utilized in developing coherent transformative public policy. This course is focused on three key dimensions of intersectional work as presented in our required reading and by our roster of guests: 1) Dismantling structural inequalities: how does intersectionality help to identify and address the root causes of discrimination; 2) Expanding by transforming (disrupt) the scope: how can intersectionality be used to impact analytical and political frames to make visible distinct forms of oppression at the ÒintersectionsÓ of lived identities and matrixes -- rather than absented, ignored, or erased; and, 3) Exacting accountability for "all lives mattering": how intersectionality may be engaged to develop and enact meaningful comprehensive justice oriented public policy.
WAGNERGRADURPL-GP 2608Spring 2018Urban EconomicsThe field of urban economics addresses a wide variety of questions and topics. At the most general level, the field introduces space into economic models and studies the location of economic activity. Urban economics typically addresses four sets of questions, and this course is organized around these four areas. The first set of questions focuses on the development of urban areas. Why do cities exist and why do some grow more rapidly? How can local governments encourage such growth? The second set of questions addresses patterns of development within metropolitan areas. Why do certain parts of metropolitan areas grow more rapidly than others? How do firms and households decide where to locate within given metropolitan areas? What determines the price of land, and how do these prices vary across space? The third set of questions concerns the spatial dimensions of urban problems. In this class, we will focus on poverty, housing, and suburban sprawl. Finally, in the last part of the class, we will briefly study the spatial aspects of local government.
ABU DHABIUGCCOL-UH 1007Consult CatalogWhat Do Leaders Do?(Formerly CCOL-AD 8) Are social outcomes primarily shaped by prominent individuals or deterministic structural forces? Some claim leadership is a mere label used to justify social change stemming from structural forces of nature and culture. Others assert history can be found in the biographies of a few prominent men and women. In this course we examine this old and unsettled debate. Considering political, social, artistic and business perspectives, we dissect the concept of leadership. Students will learn to elaborate on the interplay between culture and leadership and to which extent societies create their own leaders. The course draws on the classic work of classic and modern thinkers. We will also explore the life of prominent individuals, such as Mandela, Mother Teresa, Jobs, Soros, Churchill, Thatcher, Sheikh Zayed, among many others. We will develop a conceptual framework to link leadership and some of the most pressing global challenges, such as inequality, sustainability, peace, and understanding humanity.
ABU DHABIUGCSTS-UH 1023JConsult CatalogDemocracy and Its Critics(Formerly CORES-AD 65J) This course examines the institutional structures and intellectual justifications of democratic societies. Although democracy and equality have been deeply linked in the history of political thought, critics of democratic practice argue that formal equality among citizens has rarely prevented substantive economic and political inequalities from arising--inequalities that seem to call into question the very democratic character of self-described democratic states. We begin by examining one of history’s most radical and influential democracies, ancient Athens. After reading Thucydides’ complex account of democratic Athens at war, we will turn to ancient debates about democracy found in such authors as Aristophanes, Isocrates, Xenophon, Plato, and Aristotle. We then will compare these arguments to subsequent ones by Madison, Mill, Marx, Rawls, Dworkin, Przeworski, and Sen. The course concludes with a final week in Greece where we will recreate the intellectual dynamics of direct democracy in Athens using the Reacting to the Past game. PLEASE NOTE: This course includes a regional seminar to Greece. This course is open to NYU Abu Dhabi students only.
ABU DHABIUGPOLSC-UH 2311Consult CatalogPolitical Economy of Institutions(Formerly POLSC-AD 133) The course explores recent research on the economic causes and consequences of differences in political institutions: authoritarian vs. democratic in general, and various kinds of authoritarian (military, personalistic, etc.) and democratic (chiefly proportional vs. majoritarian and parliamentary vs. presidential) regimes. Among the economic aspects to be considered are: the wealth and economic inequality in the given society; who garners the rents that the given regime offers; and the degree of oligopoly vs. competition that characterizes economic policy.
ABU DHABIUGWRIT-UH 1115 FYWSConsult CatalogThe Art and Aesthetics of International Aid(Formerly WRIT-AD 155) In communities beset by war, disaster, or poverty, art may seem at first to be an unaffordable luxury, yet expressive culture flourishes in concert and in combat with crisis, not merely in spite of it. As globally recognized emergencies and their internationally funded responses dictate the conditions of life in more and more spaces around the world, they inspire new forms of sensory experience and engagement. Aid agencies not only directly sponsor art and media through sensitization campaigns and the promotion of local craft industries. They and their beneficiaries also arrange the perception of everyday living, whether through the choreography of resource distribution, the sculpting of infrastructure, the architecture of refugee camps, the staging of post-conflict justice and reconciliation, or the orchestration of political participation and debate. The ways in which such projects mobilize the senses are fundamental to their reception, implementation, and impact. While policy makers commonly define development and humanitarianism through rhetoric that vacillates between morality and pragmatism, it is often the aesthetics of such interventions that determine which problems are visible or invisible, which people are audible or inaudible, and which acts are sensible or senseless. This First-Year Writing Seminar will investigate the deployment of aesthetics and creativity across a variety of political, economic, medical, and environmental interventions. We will explore the many genres of writing that surround development discourse and analyze what tropes and dispositions each employs to make its claims. We will examine how attention to artistry in writing serves to deepen and clarify our own work, especially in the social sciences, and we will take special care with the delicate task of communicating pain in the wake of crisis. Students begin by writing a critique of two significant texts illustrating a debate around a recent aid project. In the second major essay, writers will narrate an ethnographic and/or phenomenological exploration of their own experience that confronts one of the course themes such as displacement, economic inequality, or media representation. The final research paper will tackle a topic in international aid, and students will present their findings to the class. Regular assignments throughout the course will address writing skills such as summarization, argumentation, and thick description, and readings will be drawn from a wide variety of geographic sites, academic disciplines, and political persuasions.
ABU DHABIUGCCOL-UH 1007Fall 2017What Do Leaders Do?(Formerly CCOL-AD 8) Are social outcomes primarily shaped by prominent individuals or deterministic structural forces? Some claim leadership is a mere label used to justify social change stemming from structural forces of nature and culture. Others assert history can be found in the biographies of a few prominent men and women. In this course we examine this old and unsettled debate. Considering political, social, artistic and business perspectives, we dissect the concept of leadership. Students will learn to elaborate on the interplay between culture and leadership and to which extent societies create their own leaders. The course draws on the classic work of classic and modern thinkers. We will also explore the life of prominent individuals, such as Mandela, Mother Teresa, Jobs, Soros, Churchill, Thatcher, Sheikh Zayed, among many others. We will develop a conceptual framework to link leadership and some of the most pressing global challenges, such as inequality, sustainability, peace, and understanding humanity.
ABU DHABIUGHISTN-UH 1001Fall 2017IdentityThe latter half of the twentieth century witnessed the emergence of mass political movements grounded in claims about the injustices perpetrated upon specific social groups (women, racial/ethnic minorities, indigenous groups, the LGBT community etc). These movements are supported by “ and contribute to “ a growing literature concerned with the character of the identities being defended. As the concept of ˜identity ™ has become indispensable to contemporary political discourse, this course broadly explores the origins and evolution of various categories to which the concept of ˜identity ™ has been affixed (gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, class, and sexuality). It describes the emergence and evolution of various categories of identity, tracing a long arc from the Neolithic Revolution to the present. By exploring how identities have been negotiated in a variety of contexts, this course aims to highlight that identities are fluid, socially-constructed, relational, and contextual
ABU DHABIUGSRPP-UH 1810XFall 2017Islam and Society(Formerly SRPP-AD 112X) In this seminar, students will come to understand the diverse and dynamic roles that religious and cultural Islam can play in contemporary societies, especially those in the œMiddle East  and North Africa. After critically examining what might be meant by Islam and Muslims in the first place, students will use social scientific case studies to investigate how Islam does (or does not) come to matter in various sectors of society, including government and the state, the legal system, politics and social movements, gender relations, sexuality, education, the economy, popular culture, and everyday life. By the end of this course, students will be able to critically analyze the ways that religious and cultural Islam can impact society and social life. Each student will be expected to complete a final research project exploring the core questions posed by the course
ABU DHABIUGSRPP-UH 2411Fall 2017Wealth and Inequality(Formerly SRPP-AD 127) The course offers an overview of the causes and consequences of social inequality. Topics in this course include: the concepts, theories, and measures of inequality; race, gender, and other caste systems; social mobility and social change; institutional support for stratification, including family, schooling, and work; political power and role of elites; and comparative patterns of inequality, including capitalist, socialist, and post-socialist societies
ABU DHABIUGSRPP-UH 2614XFall 2017Women and Work in the Gulf(Formerly SRPP-AD 140X) This course critically examines how women feature in contemporary debates about employment, development, and nationalism in the context of the Gulf Cooperative Council countries. The course provides a philosophical foundation for debates about women, work, and difference based on feminist theories. Students will explore postcolonial perspectives on feminism and difference, feminist Marxist critiques of capitalism, and feminist Islamist critiques of modernity. The course provides an overview of how women in the Gulf feature in contemporary discourses as participants in œglobally competitive  economies, mothers of œfuture generations of citizens , and symbols of œtradition and culture . The third part of the course addresses public policy and legal frameworks shaping women ™s work, exploring how different categories of œwomen  are produced through public policy programs such as workforce nationalization, education policy, social policy, and the interplay of national and international laws governing domestic work, human trafficking, and domestic abuse. The course will host a number of academics, activists, and policymakers
ABU DHABIUGARTH-UH 2118XFall 2017Contemporary Art and Politics in the Arab World(Formerly VISAR-AD 171X) In the short span of thirty years art of the Arab World moved from the periphery of international art to the center of global visual art production. This course examines the conditions that prompted this change and the theoretical framework that currently situates Arab art within the global discourse on visual art. Focusing on selected artists from key periods of art production, the course will explore the impact of political, social and market forces on the region ™s art. Examining art production in relation to state formation, identity, gender politics, representation and reception, globalization, and activism. The course will also explore the recent discourse on Islamic art and its links to modern and contemporary art of the region
ABU DHABIUGCSTS-UH 1053Fall 2017Understanding UrbanizationWhy do humans continue to build and flock to cities? What makes a city work? How do we measure qualities of urban life? This course sheds light on the complex process of urbanization. It begins with debates about the different recent trajectories of urbanization in light of economic and political dynamics. Why have some trajectories been more successful than others? What factors have shaped a certain trajectory? What lessons we can learn from them? The focus will then shift to a myriad of contemporary cases from around the globe. The aim is to deconstruct common conceptions of dualities: development/underdevelopment, wealth/poverty, formality/informality, and centrality/marginality. The course material is structured around themes that highlight the main challenges that urban dwellers and policy makers face in the following areas: the economy, income inequality, marginalization, service provision, housing, infrastructure, immigration, safety, and the environment. These themes will allow students to engage with various forms of contestations and to consider the role of urban social movements
ABU DHABIUGHIST-UH 3319Fall 2017African American Freedom StruggleThis course explores the African American freedom struggle in the United States. It analyzes its historical origins, African American emancipation during the Civil War and reconstruction, migration patterns and economic conditions in the agricultural and industrial sectors, "Jim Crow  laws and the œSeparate, but equal  doctrine, as well as the impact of US military engagements and the Cold War on race relations during the 20th century. The course examines the various challenges to legalized segregation in the aftermath of World War II, the powerful grassroots campaigns of African American civil rights activists and organizations during the 1960/70s and their political and cultural impact, and the emergence of black nationalism and black power. It also traces the ways in which the struggle for racial equality in the US was perceived as part of a larger struggle against colonialism around the world. Furthermore, the course incorporates discussions about affirmative action, the "prison-industrial complex", the notion of a œpost-racial America  under the Obama administration into the broader context of an ongoing quest for equal rights and social justice in the US. No prerequisites
ACCRAUGHIST-UA 9570Fall 2017Topics in African History: History of West AfricaThe course provides an introduction to the history of West Africa in the period of the Atlantic slave trade and since the abolition of the slave trade. Instead of presenting a comprehensive survey, covering every country in the vast West African sub-region, the course takes a topical approach by focusing on a selection of themes and issues that are crucial to developing an understanding of modern West African history. Themes to be discussed in the course include the land and peoples of West Africa, the Atlantic slave trade, explorers, missionaries, settlers and cross-cultural encounters; expansion of European power after the abolition of the slave trade; European conquest and resistance; West African aspects of Pan-Africanism and contacts between African nationalists and pan-African leaders in the Diaspora, nationalism and struggles for independence; developments in post colonial West Africa
BUENOS AIRESUGANTH-UA 9100Fall 2017Culture, Identity and Politics in Latin America (in Spanish)Spanish and Portuguese Prerequisites: Students must have taken or be enrolled in SPAN-UA 100. The course comprises topics related to culture, cultural identity and cultural and identity politics referred to five cases located in Latin America: 1) indigenous peoples in Argentina (areas of Chaco: Qom/toba- Wichí and Mocoví, and Patagonia-Pampa: Rankülche) and indigenous peoples in Amazon (Achuar) and, 2) Andean farmers (Aymaras) and indigenous workers of Chaco (Toba), 3) popular sectors of the City of Buenos Aires ( œvilleros  [shanty town residents], pickets, "barras bravas" [soccer hooligans]) and 4) middle class in San Pablo and Buenos Aires. Through this empirical tour students will learn about and analyze different records related to the debate on "culture" that commenced years ago: essentialism and constructivism, redefinition of opposing concepts nature/culture, multiculturalism, domination and resistance, activism, etc
CASUGDRLIT-UA 255Consult CatalogAfro-American DramaThe study of African American dramatic traditions from early minstrelsy to turn-of-the-century musical extravaganzas; from the Harlem Renaissance folk plays to realistic drama of the 1950s; from the militant protest drama of the 1960s to the historical and experimental works of the present. Issues of race, gender, class; of oppression and empowerment; of marginality and assimilation are explored in the works of such playwrights as Langston Hughes, Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy, Charles Fuller, George C. Wolfe, Ntozake Shange, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Anna Deavere Smith. The sociohistorical context of each author is also briefly explored.
CASUGFYSEM-UA 634Consult CatalogBlack Language MattersThis course is about language, specifically the myriad of ways that many African Americans express their personal and community identities. The course focuses primarily on the language variety known as African American English, which often serves as a guise for deep-seated racial ideologies about African Americans and Black people more generally. In this course, students learn about the linguistic structure of African American English and theories about its origins. We explore how language is used to convey social identity, particularly regarding race and ethnicity, and make meaning of one’s life. Issues addressed include language variation, language contact and change, in addition to social and linguistic discrimination. Finally, we consider African American English as the nexus of ideas on race, identity, sexuality, violence and equality in the United States and globally found in Cornel West’s Race Matters (1994) and the more recent #BlackLivesMatter movement. Students develop research projects on African American English regarding language production or perception.
CASUGHIST-UA 814Consult CatalogRace, Civil War & Reconstruction
CASUGANTH-UA 323Consult CatalogRace, "Difference," & Social InequalityExamines the formation and deployment of the category ?race? in historical and cross-cultural perspective. Investigates how racism operates within wider systems of complementary exclusions tied to gender, class, national, and imperial identities. Addresses topics such as race in the construction of colonial and postcolonial hierarchies and ideologies; the production of ?whiteness? in U.S. cultural politics; global (re)articulations of race-cum-ethnocultural identities; and the environmental justice movement as a contemporary terrain of struggle in the elaboration of politics of difference.
CASUGPol-UA 315Consult CatalogControversies in Public Policy: Logic and EvidenceThis course is about using logic to think about issues of public policy and evidence to do the same thing. One way to think about this course is it is sabermetrics (logic and evidence applied to baseball, and in Moneyball) applied to vastly more important topics than baseball: making schools better, designing health policy and dealing with climate change (with tons of other policy applications possible, but we will focus on these three).
CASUGAHSEM-UA 228Fall 2017Disability Studies and Latin@ American LiteratureThis seminar explores Latin@ American literature through the framework of disability studies, an interdisciplinary field that interrogates disability as it is socially constructed while seeking out alternative/non-ableist politics and aesthetics. With an emphasis on 20th- and 21st-century Latin American fiction, but also considering poetry and intermedial work as well as works by U.S. Latin@ authors, we will pay particular attention to how bodies are represented in literature, and to how literature can model new social bodies.
CASUGANTH-UA 16Fall 2017Language, Power, IdentityExplores how identity is a process of œbecoming  rather than a mode of œbeing" by examining how speakers enact their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and socioeconomic class through everyday conversations, narratives, performances, literacy activities, and public debates. Also explores the moral and political consequences of people's identification strategies by examining how their beliefs about language reinforce or contest normative power structures. Readings on the relationship between bilingual education and accent discrimination, multilingualism and youth counterculture, migration and code-switching, media and religious publics, linguistic nationalism and xenophobia, and literacy and neo/liberalism in different areas of the world.
CASUGANTH-UA 36Fall 2017Global Biocultures: Anthropological Perspectives on Public HealthSurveys the mutual shaping of culture and biology in diverse contexts around the world. Starts with sociocultural theories of biocultural process and ends with ethnographies of disability, drugs, food, place, pain, and biotechnology. Examines the relationship between larger political economic structures and individual subjectivities, and examines biological experience as simultaneously material and socioculturally plastic.
CASUGANTH-UA 113Fall 2017Disability Worlds: Anthropological PerspectivesThis course examines the genealogy of disability as a topic in anthropology and related disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, exploring the relationship of such work to disability studies and activism. We will consider early key works, as well as recent ethnographies based in different parts of the world and first person accounts. Overall, we stress the significance of disability for theorizing human difference. The course will also incorporate guest lectures, films, performance and relevant off-site activities in NYC
CASUGARTH-UA 650Fall 2017Special Topics in Urban Design & Architecture: Affordable HousingThis course counts for Seminar credit for Urban Design majors. 4 credits. Permission of Professor Broderick or Professor Ritter required for enrollment. Pre-requisite: History of Architecture and Shaping the Urban Environment. Housing is shelter and much more. It is the basic building block of neighborhoods, communities and cities. The creation of Affordable Housing, Sustainable Communities and Livable Cities has been the topic of numerous books, worldwide conferences, and serious research and study by architects, urban designers, planners, environmental psychologists, sociologists, real estate professionals, economists and legal professionals in universities, governmental institutes, professional organizations and the United Nations. The architect ™s role in the creation of housing today is an important one. Achieving truly affordable housing however, requires a complex team of real estate professionals and government, along with private and public participation and cooperation. The course will look at Affordable Housing through a combination of illustrated lectures, Guest lecturers, and site visits in an attempt to understand not only the planning and architecture of Affordable Housing, but also the history, new technology, culture, humanity and opportunities in the creation of Housing, Neighborhoods, Sustainable Communities and Livable Cities. Most importantly, it will demonstrate the enormous commitment required to participate in the solution of the housing problem in our communities, our cities, our nation and the world.
CASUGCAMS-UA 104Fall 2017When the Nightmare Is Real: Trauma in Child & Adolescent HealthEvery childhood is fraught with complications, but some children are exposed to traumatic experiences that have a lasting impact on their development and health. Many children in New York City are still reeling from the effects of September 11, yet these numbers pale in comparison to the more than three million reported cases of child abuse and neglect in the United States annually, in addition to the many more cases that go unreported. This course examines the neurobiological and psychological effects of trauma on children, adolescents, and their families. We investigate the impact of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and neglect, war, terrorism, natural disasters, bereavement, and medical illness. In addition, we explore the concepts of vulnerability and resilience to discover why most affected children successfully traverse their trauma. Finally, we discuss the treatment modalities commonly employed with traumatized children, adolescents, and their families.
CASUGCAMS-UA 151Fall 2017Cultural Perspectives on Mental Health & IllnessHow do different cultures view mental health and illness? Why do some ethnic groups readily accept mental health care while others generally avoid the psychiatrist or psychologist at all costs? How does bicultural or multicultural identity and minority status affect one ™s psychological development? This course seeks to explore what we know about how culture, ethnicity, race and minority status affect the mental health of children, adolescents, and young adults in modern America. We will start by studying the process of acculturation and mental health issues specific to immigrant youth and children of immigrants. We will delve into the cultural aspects of identity development, family dynamics, parenting, stigma, and mental health disparities and then segue into stereotypes and intergroup bias. Readings will draw from the growing body of research literature, and examples from popular arts, media and entertainment will be incorporated as supplemental material for class discussion. Students will review current treatments and participate in class discussions. Students of all backgrounds will be encouraged to explore mental health and illness with a broadened cultural perspective.
CASUGCORE-UA 400Fall 2017Texts and Ideas: Topics ”Democracy, Knowledge, and ¨Introduces students to classic works both defending and criticizing democracy, asking how we should characterize equality among democratic citizens, and whether this equality hinders or helps us to produce knowledge and to make wise decisions. Beginning with democracy in ancient Athens and key works of Greek political thought, we move to classics of modern political thought, focusing on questions of representation, deliberation, and expertise, concluding with the implications of these arguments for racial inequality in the United States and the argument for the importance of racial integration as a means both of realizing racial equality and of improving the quality of democratic decision-making. Readings: Aristophanes' Wasps, Plato's Protagoras and Republic, Aristotle's Politics, Rousseau's Second Discourse and Social Contract, Tocqueville's Democracy in America, DuBois ™ Souls of Black Folk, Anderson ™s Imperative of Integration, selections from Mill, Dewey, and Hayek.
CASUGCORE-UA 400Fall 2017Texts and Ideas: Topics ”The "Normal"Can we define "normal" without recourse to the œdeviant : the queer, the child(ish), the ill, the non-white, the unproductive or unprofitable? We explore the notion of the normal historically, understanding that what is perverse or abjected in one time and place may become valued or at least accepted in another. Our modes of inquiry will be literary, historical, philosophic and cultural, enabling students to engage with ideas across a range of disciplines and providing a strong basis for further humanistic inquiry. Topics include recent cultural theory on whiteness, fatness, sickness, and childhood; and a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art will help us frame some ideas about normal in various kinds of representations, portraits and still-lifes in particular. Our goal is to make everyone and everything usefully strange, or newly weird: especially everything ”from Normcore to normal se ”that seems, well, normal. Reading include works by Plato, Smith, Marx, Freud, Foucault, Stein, Woolf, Nella Larsen, George Schuyler
CASUGCORE-UA 500Fall 2017Cultures and Contexts: Topics ”Urban Life in the European City, Ancient to Early ModernThroughout history, cities have been among the most complex forms of social and cultural organization. In the premodern period, many cities were also important political players with a high degree of autonomy; some even pursued imperial ambitions. Almost all functioned as centers of religious, economic, and cultural activity. Many cities were separated from their environs by massive walls of stone, underscoring the distinct character of the urban community. In reality, however, the fortunes of a city were often crucially tied to immigration and the diversity it engendered. And although every city aspired to construct its own unique identity, as reflected in founding myths or specific artistic agendas, many premodern cities had commonalities. They also faced the same problems, such as social inequality, overcrowding, and environmental crises. We explore the history of the Western city from a multidimensional and comparative perspective encompassing ancient Athens, imperial Rome, medieval Paris, Renaissance Venice, and eighteenth-century London, paying special attention to everyday life, and adopting a bottom-up approach to see how people of different backgrounds (e.g., gender, religion, and class) have experienced, imagined, and struggled with urban life. Can this rich archive of urban experiences from the past teach us lessons for the metropolises of our time?
CASUGCORE-UA 534Fall 2017Cultures and Contexts: The Black AtlanticThis course considers the Black Atlantic as a socio-cultural economic space from the first arrival of Africans in the ˜New World, ™ beginning around in the 15th century, through the rise of slavery in the Americas. During this class we will trace the origins and importance of the concept of the Black Atlantic within broad political contexts, paying special attention to the changing social, cultural and economic relations that shaped community formation among people of African descent and laid the foundations for modern political and economic orders. Once we have established those foundations, we will think about the Black Atlantic as a critical site of cultural production. Using the frame of the Atlantic to ask questions about the relationship between culture and political economy. We will explore a range of genres--film, fiction, music, as well as formal scholarship--so as to explore questions of evidence in the context of the real and the imaginary. Topics to be covered include African enslavement and settlement in Africa and the Americas; the development of transatlantic racial capitalism; variations in politics and culture between empires in the Atlantic world; creolization, plantation slavery and slave society; the politics and culture of the enslaved; the Haitian Revolution; slave emancipation; and contemporary black Atlantic politics and racial capitalism.
CASUGCORE-UA 539Fall 2017Cultures and Contexts: Asian/Pacific/American CulturesExamines significant historical and contemporary moments through an analysis of culture and power and how cultural productions--film, television dramas, novels, visual art, national monuments and memorials, among others--produce ideas, stories and silences in different historical moments about different Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders that have contemporary resonance today. For instance, how is it that the bikini, which most people associate with suggestive beach wear, has its origins in the U.S. nuclear testing of the first hydrogen bomb on the Bikini Atoll that irradiated much of the Pacific? How do historical representations of Asian American men make the meteoric rise of basketball star Jeremy Lin so unexpected and anomalous? How do histories of U.S. wars in Asia coupled with anti-Asian immigrant legislation shape ideas about Asian Americans as œperpetual foreigners  even centuries after Asian migration to the United States? Using different methods of cultural inquiry such as visual and popular culture, sports and media studies, literary critique, political economy and legal studies, we examine the complex ways that ideas about race, gender, sexuality, and indigeneity produce unequal power relations in U.S. society.
CASUGCORE-UA 543Fall 2017Cultures and Contexts: KoreaThe principles, logic, and dynamics that have constituted the contemporary divided Korea. The postcolonial era in Korea soon led to the Korean War and then the Cold War, which took the two Koreas down dramatically different pathways. South Korea achieved rapid and dramatic economic development, eventually witnessing exemplary democratization movements emerge from the fight against dictatorial government, class inequality, and sexual discrimination. Despite an earlier start on economic development following its socialist revolution, North Korea has suffered from a poor economy and a repressive authoritarian regime. Through ethnographies, histories, and films, we explore nationalism based on developmentalism, militarism, and neoliberalism; globalized sports, capital, people, and religion; crisis in class, youth, memories; and North Korean issues.
CASUGCOLIT-UA 300Fall 2017Topics: Exile, Migration, and Displacement in Literature and Film: A Transatlantic PerspectiveThis course proposes a cultural and historical examination of contemporary experiences of migration, exile or displacement with a particular focus on the Spanish-speaking world. With a cross-disciplinary and transatlantic perspective, we will analyze a selection of literary works (novels, short stories, poetry) and visual representations (documentaries, fiction movies) to gain insights into topics such as exile or deportation due to repressive dictatorships and governments, states of homelessness and estrangement, psychological and/or geographical displacements, migration movements from rural to urban settings, the journeys of Latin American migrants to the North, or of Africans to Spain. Primary materials will be paired with texts by leading cultural and political thinkers working on notions of citizenship, biopower/biopolitics, xenophobia, racism, nationalism, displacement, or memory.
CASUGECON-UA 227Fall 2017Urban EconomicsThe city as an economic organization. Urbanization trends, functional specialization, and the nature of growth within the city; organization of economic activity within the city and its outlying areas, the organization of the labor market, and problems of urban poverty; the urban public economy; housing and land-use problems; transportation problems; and special problems within the public sector.
CASUGECON-UA 233Fall 2017Poverty & Income DistributionDefines poverty and welfare. Analyzes who the poor are, why some people are rich and others poor, equality of opportunity, income and status, inequality, trends in the degree of inequality, governments role in income distribution, and international comparisons of inequality
CASUGECON-UA 323Fall 2017Economic DevelopmentStudies the problem of economic underdevelopment, with special reference to the countries of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The building blocks of economic theory are used to understand the historical experiences of these countries. Macroeconomic topics covered include economic growth, income distribution, and poverty, with particular emphasis on the concept of underdevelopment as a circular, self-reinforcing trap. Microeconomic topics include the study of Prerequisites: V31.0010, V31.0012, and V31.0238, or V31.0011 and V31.0013. Studies the problem of economic underdevelopment, with special reference to the countries of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The building blocks of economic theory are used to understand the historical experiences of these countries. Macroeconomic topics covered include economic growth, income distribution, and poverty, with particular emphasis on the concept of underdevelopment as a circular, self-reinforcing trap. Microeconomic topics include the study of particular markets that are especially relevant to developing countries: those for land, labor, and credit. Notions of market fragmentation, limited information, and incentive problems receive emphasis. Ends with international issues: trading patterns, capital flows, and global financial crises are studied from the viewpoint of developing countries
CASUGECON-UA 353Fall 2017Public EconomicsIn alternate years, stresses policy implications and the development of the theory. Analysis of government economic policies and behavior. Normative and positive economics; the fundamental welfare theorems. What goods should the government provide (public goods)? When should the government tax private behavior (externalities)? Income redistribution and the welfare program. Who pays the tax (tax incidence)? The role of debt policy. On what should taxes be levied (optimal taxation)?
CASUGENVST-UAFall 2017Environmental Activism: From the Local to the GlobalThis course examines how activists try to change the world. We examine popular movements, social movements, NGOs and networks to understand why they choose the issues they do, how they seek to effect change, and whether and why they are successful at doing so. The inquiry is grounded in several approaches to activism: international relations theories of non-state actors, sociological study of social movements, and various more radical approaches. We begin with a survey of these theoretical approaches, so that students can be conversant in the basic theory and vocabulary of activism. We then examine the growing role of activism in local and global politics amidst the broader trend of globalization. The course will examine four œbig questions  with respect to environmental activism: 1) When do activists mobilize? 2) What tactics do they use? 3) What explains success and failure in advocacy? 4) What are the broader political implications of a global class of elite advocates?
CASUGFREN-UA 901Fall 2017French Slavery in Literature, Art and FilmBetween the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries, France was responsible for the kidnapping, forced transport and enslavement of over a million Africans. The deep cultural effects of this violent history, both in France and in its former colonies, have only recently become the subject of wide discussion. A key challenge for understanding French slavery is the complete lack of any known slave narratives. This absence raises difficult questions: how do literature, art, or film relate to testimony? Are some forms, media, or genres more legitimate or effective than others to describe slavery? The course explores these questions through the study of literature, film, paintings, and memorials. Primary sources are in French, while secondary sources are in both French and in English. Class discussions are conducted in French, as well as oral and written assignments, will reinforce your skills in textual and visual analysis, as well as your oral and written proficiency.
CASUGHIST-UA 661Fall 2017Black Women in AmericaExplores varieties of African American women's experiences (including class, ethnicity, sexuality, region, and generation). Endeavors to go beyond the black/white binary by considering black women's relationships to both intraracial and broader communities. Additionally, assesses how gender, race, and class have influenced black women's work, activism, political involvement, and creative output in the United States. Takes an interdisciplinary approach by drawing from history, memoir, sociology, feminist theory, film studies, legal theory, and the popular press.
CASUGHIST-UA 814Fall 2017Race, Civil War, and ReconstructionUnderstanding the history of the American Civil War brings its present-day legacies sharply into focus. With race and slavery at the center, this course explores the Civil War, Reconstruction, and their aftermath, proceeding from two premises: first, that race and slavery were central to the causes and consequences of the war; and second, that the war and its legacies remain central to modern U.S. history. Over the course of the semester, we will follow multiple threads and trajectories, illuminating the experiences of northerners and southerners; African Americans, whites, and Native Americans; soldiers and civilians; men and women; rich, middling, and poor. In tandem with reading an array of scholarship, we will also reflect critically upon the ways in which the Civil War has been remembered and represented in popular culture.
CASUGHIST-GA 1809Fall 2017Slavery, Colonialism and Revolution in the Caribbean This course explores major themes and debates of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Caribbean history: slavery, capitalism, and emancipation; colonialism, empire, and revolution; and nationalism and race. Themes will be studied from a variety of approaches and perspectives: from very local micro-historical studies, to comparative ones, to more sweeping global treatments. Throughout we will attempt to bridge the vertical lines that often separate the study of the different linguistic and imperial Caribbean. We will also consider different frameworks for the study of the Caribbean, from traditional area studies, hemispheric studies, transnational US history, African Diaspora and Atlantic World.
CASUGIRISH-UA 187Fall 2017The Irish in AmericaFrom the seventeenth century to the present, Irish people have been crossing the Atlantic to North America. They are one of the most significant ethnic groups to ever migrate from Europe to the United States. Their impact has been disproportional to their numbers but this only partially explains our contemporary understanding of œIrish America.  Ethnicity is an imprint and defining feature of American life yet the Irish experience with it over the past four centuries is a story complicated by multiple generations, diversity of class, continuing immigration, and rapid changes in both the homeland and the receiving country. This course will consider the factors affecting emigration from Ireland; examine the impact of the Irish on the development of the United States since the colonial period, particularly on its cities; study the changing Irish image in American popular culture; and consider what the Irish can teach us about the evolution of ethnic identity. The ultimate goal of this course is to learn to think historically.
CASUGJOUR-UA 505Fall 2017Issues and Ideas: Covering Sub Sahara AfricaAfrica covers a vast area of 55 countries and 1.1 billion inhabitants. There are countries that are emerging economic powers and heading towards industrialization. In other cases, some countries are taking the lead in developing technology hubs, and testing out new forms of mobile banking and virtual money. Other countries wield considerable œsoft power  via their film, music and contemporary culture and they are driving the way Africans present themselves to the world. Comprehensive coverage of Africa is scant. The sparse coverage is often a variation of an incomplete portrait that has dominated the Western media for the last 50 years: tales of starvation, political instability and disease are mainstays. There is often little or no historical or political context in most of this coverage. This course will provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues around the various regions on the African continent. We will examine the role of religion, including religious extremism that has led to the near- splintering of several societies; the struggles to develop viable democratic models; cultural norms and practices; and issues of economic development and empowerment. We will focus on the challenges of telling stories from Sub-Saharan Africa that are not the same old stories, with the same tired clichés.
CASUGLING-UA 15Fall 2017Language & SocietyConsiders contemporary issues in the interaction of language and society, particularly work on speech variation and social structure. Focuses on ways in which social factors affect language. Topics include language as a social and political entity; regional, social, and ethnic speech varieties; bilingualism; and pidgin and creole languages.
CASUGLING-UA 30Fall 2017Language in Latin AmericaExamines the diversity of language usage in modern Latin America and considers historical perspectives as to how the present situation came about. Considers the dialectology of Latin America: how and why American varieties of Spanish and Portuguese differ from European varieties; the distribution and nature of dialect differences in different regions of the Americas. Examines sociolinguistic issues, such as class and ethnic differences in Spanish and Portuguese in the Americas, the origin and development of standard and nonstandard varieties, and the effects of contact with Amerindian and African languages. Considers Spanish- and Portuguese-based creoles and the question of prior creolization in the popular speech of Brazil, Cuba, and other areas with a substantial population of African decent. Other topics include bilingualism, code switching, language attitudes, the impact of contact with English, and the present status of indigenous languages.
CASUGMEIS-UA 690Fall 2017The Emergence of The Modern Middle EastSurveys main political, social, economic, and intellectual currents of the 20th century. Emphasis on historical background and development of current problems in the region. Topics include imperialism, nationalism, religion, Orientalism, women, class formation, oil, the Arab-Israeli crisis, and the Iranian revolution.
CASUGMEIS-UA 750Fall 2017Politics of The Middle EastHistorical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems using a few selected countries for
CASUGMEIS-UA 747Fall 2017Arab Theatre & FilmExamines recent trends in contemporary Arab theatre and film, contextualizing these within a broader history of Arab performance. Particular attention is given to how experimental practitioners have explored issues of human rights and the control of territories under the modern state. Strategies addressed include the conflation of the past and present as a means of exploring the persistence of the colonial power structure in the modern Arab world; the use of the parable to speak truth to power; the incorporation of the populist entertainment forms that directly engage the audience; and the use of familiar tales to explore new political realities.
CASUGMEIS-UA 798Fall 2017Topics in Modern Middle Eastern CultureForced Migration, Eugenics and Humanism
CASUGPOL-UA 195Fall 2017Political Theory Seminar: Theories of Justice——
CASUGPOL-UA 360Fall 2017Urban Gov'T & PoliticsStudy of politics and politicians in the contemporary American city. Evolution of local party organizations, the rise and fate of party œbosses,  and the predicament of the ordinary citizen in the urban community. Patterns of city politics against the background of American social and cultural history, including the impulse toward reform and the effects of reform efforts on the distribution of power in the community. Conceptions of effective leadership in urban politics and the role of the police, the press, and œgood government  groups in local political life.
CASUGPOL-UA 560Fall 2017East Asian Politics: China & JapanIntroduction to the workings of the political systems of China and Japan. Examines the impact of tradition, demands of modernization, ideology, role of the elite, and social dynamics, as well as political institutions and processes. Compares the Chinese and the Japanese "models" of development with a view to evaluating their relevance to other areas.
CASUGPSYCH-UA 51Fall 2017Abnormal PsychologyThe kinds, dynamics, causes, and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include early concepts of abnormal behavior; affective disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, and personality disorders; the nature and effectiveness of traditional and modern methods of psychotherapy; and viewpoints of major psychologists past and present.
CASUGSCA-UA 90Fall 2017Advanced Research Seminar: Ethnography, Difference & the CityThis course will introduce students to the fundamentals of designing and carrying out ethnographic research within the urban context. Designed around a semester long research project, the course will draw upon an eclectic selection of readings that both address the theoretical and ethical questions of qualitative research and expose the possibilities of reflexive methods for urban analysis. In particular, it will focus on ethnography as an adept tool for the study of difference in the city. Seminar sessions will be complemented by field trips in order to explore how we might closely observe questions of difference as they manifest themselves in New York City. Open to seniors majoring in AFRI, AMST, APA, GSS, LAST, MET and SCA majors with relevant focus/coursework.
CASUGSCA-UA 101Fall 2017Social and Cultural Analysis 101Introduces theories, methods, and political trajectories central to the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA). SCA 101 addresses how individuals and populations structure their worlds and navigate the resulting social, cultural, and political terrain. It privileges scholarly work with an intersectional approach, drawing on theoretical insights from such fields as social geography, feminism and queer studies, ethnic studies, urban and metropolitan studies, critical race theory, labor studies, and cultural studies.
CASUGSCA-UA 180Fall 2017Topics in Africana StudiesExplores specific issues dealing with the black urban experience, focusing on social and cultural institutions. Possible themes, which vary from semester to semester, include class and poverty, the police, urban development, education, sports, music, and art.
CASUGSCA-UA 230Fall 2017Intersect: Race, Gender, & Sexuality in U.S. HistDrawing on the histories of African, Asian, Latino, European, and Native Americans of both genders and many sexualities, explores the complex and important intersection of gender, race, and sexuality in the United States from the 17th century through the 20th, in historically related case studies. Starting in the period of European imperialism in the Americas, it examines the ways that gender, race, and sexuality shaped cultural and political policies and debates surrounding the Salem witch trials; slavery, abolition, and lynching; U.S. imperialism in Puerto Rico and Hawaii; the politics of welfare and reproduction; cultural constructions of manliness, masculinity, and citizenship; and responses to the AIDS pandemic in a global context.
CASUGSCA-UA 380Fall 2017Topics in A/P/A Studies:Looking at Chinatown through the lens of three global cities ”New York, Havana, and Kingston, we will explore the flows of laboring black/ Chinese/ Latino mariners, merchants, and migrants between the US and the Caribbean. With an emphasis on literature and material culture, what narratives can we read from the menus of New York ™s Cuban Chinese restaurants in conversation with novels imagining the gangsters of 1950s Chinatown, Kingston. How are the modernist aesthetics of Wilfredo Lam ™s art in conversation with and the intimacies of the Chino Latino experience in Cristina Garcia ™s Monkey Hunting? Beyond European colonialism, students will examine the deeper history of these three port cities to understand the enmeshed afterlives of enslavement and indenture in the US, Cuba, and Jamaica. (Counts as SCA faculty taught elective for these major minors: AFR, AMST, APA, GSS, LAST, MET SCA)
CASUGSCA-UA 803Fall 2017Race and Ethnicity (cross list Soc-UA 135)What is 'race' exactly? Defining the concept presents a real challenge. This class explores what race and ethnicity mean, beginning with historical ideas about human difference. Comparing American beliefs and practices to those found in other societies, we will pay special attention to the particular notions and hierarchies of race that emerge in different times and places. The course also investigates the roles that institutions like the media, the arts, the state, and the sciences play in shaping our understandings of race and ethnicity. We will conclude by considering the predictions that scholars have made about the future of racial stratification in the United States.
CASUGSOC-UA 474Fall 2017Terrorism and Political Violence in the Modern WorldFollowing the 9/11 attacks, there has been much discussion of œterrorism  and political violence more generally by politicians, journalists, and scholars. But what exactly is œterrorism,  and how does it differ from other types of violence? This course addresses the following questions: How and for what purposes has the idea of œterrorism  been conceptualized and used by politicians, journalists, and scholars? How have scholars attempted to explain terrorism and political violence? Why and under what conditions does collective violence and terrorism in particular seem to arise? Are terrorism or other forms of political violence ever justified? And does terrorism or violence actually work? If so, how and under what circumstances? To answer these questions, we will examine a wide range of historical cases of terrorism and political violence in the modern world.
CASUGSOC-UA 934 -Fall 2017Seminar: GenocideOPEN ONLY TO JUNIOR & SENIOR SOCIOLOGY MAJORS --PERMISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT REQUIRED. ACCESS CODE MUST BE OBTAINED AT DEPARTMENT. This course examines human rights violations, especially genocide, and justice in the global world. To achieve this goal we explore the links between human rights abuses, especially, genocide and transitional justice tools such as trials, truth and reconciliation and lustration. Particular attention is paid to societies in transition to democracy and/or capitalism and the political, economic and social contexts of these transitions. First, we focus on the use of tribunal prosecutions/ trials and reparations as transitional justice tools in post-Nazi Germany. Second, we analyze the transitional justice tool of truth and reconciliation in post-apartheid South Africa. Third, we examine the use of lustration as a transitional justice tool in post-communist Czechoslovakia. Fourth, we trace the concurrent jurisdiction approach (tribunal trial-national trial-Gacaca) in post-conflict Rwanda. Fifth, we examine the use of the International Criminal Court (ICC) as a transitional justice tool in Cambodia. Sixth, we examine the recent use of universal jurisdiction as a transitional tool in Chile. Finally, we will analyze the transitional justice tools used to deal with human rights abuses in countries chosen by students in the class.
CASUGSOC-UAFall 2017Seminar in Sociology: Sociology of PunishmentOPEN ONLY TO JUNIOR & SENIOR SOCIOLOGY MAJORS -- PERMISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT REQUIRED. ACCESS CODE MUST BE OBTAINED AT DEPARTMENT. This seminar aims to help students understand the system of criminal punishment that operates in contemporary America and to explore the ways in which American punishment “ like many other features of US society “ appears unusual or even ˜exceptional ™ in comparison to other nations and other historical periods. The seminar begins with the observation that American criminal punishment appears remarkably severe. Compared to other nations, the US federal system and each of the 50 states exhibit (i) higher rates of incarceration; (ii) higher rates of correctional supervision; (iii) extraordinary penalties such as capital punishment and life imprisonment without possibility of parole (LWOP); (iv) more extensive collateral consequences such as disfranchisement, limitations on employment and residence, loss of welfare benefits; (v) more publicly-available and longer-lasting criminal records; and (vi) a distinctive system of imposing administrative fees and custodial charges on indigent offenders and inmates. No other nation today deploys penal power in these ways and to this extent. No liberal democracy, and possibly no totalitarian regime, has ever developed a penal system of this size and scope. And prior to the 1970s, America ™s penal system was much less harsh and far-reaching. The aim of the seminar is to explain how this situation came about and why America has gone so much further than other nations in its use of the power to punish.
CASUGSOC-UA 936Fall 2017Adv Sem: Sociology of MoralsOPEN ONLY TO JUNIOR & SENIOR SOCIOLOGY MAJORS -- PERMISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT REQUIRED. ACCESS CODE MUST BE OBTAINED AT DEPARTMENT. This seminar will focus on a set of questions that arise from the recognition that there are diverse moral outlooks that involve incompatible moral judgments. How much diversity is there and how deep does it go? What makes an outlook and judgment moral? How recent is this recognition: does it arise from our increasingly multicultural societies and from the ever more prevalent discourse of human rights across the world? To what extent is that discourse ethnocentric ”a kind of moral imperialism? Are there non-Western (e.g. East Asian) cultures, which offer a challenge and alternative to talk of human rights? Do different moralities correlate with cultural differences? Are we witnessing a ˜clash of civilizations ™? How should we respond to the claims of cultural relativism? We will read some classical texts ”such as Michel de Montaigne ™s Essays on custom and on cannibalism and Ruth Benedict on patterns of culture, and also contemporary work by sociologists, moral philosophers and others that discusses multiculturalism, moral and cultural relativism and the theory and practice of human rights.
CASUGSOC-UA 937Fall 2017Seminar: Urban EthnographyThis seminar will focus on how ethnographers have analyzed the city and urban life. We will examine how cities have changed over time, how ethnographies reveal those changes, and, in turn, how doing ethnographies has evolved. What sociological questions can be answered ethnographically and what do ethnographies leave unanswered?
CENTER FOR URBAN STUDIES AND PROGRESSGRADCUSP-GX 7003Fall 2017Civic Analytics and Urban IntelligenceCities are increasingly data-rich environments, and data-driven approaches to operations, policy, and planning are beginning to emerge as a way to address global social challenges of sustainability, resilience, social equity, and quality of life. Understanding the various types of urban data and data sources “ structured and unstructured, from land use records to social media and video “ and how to manage, integrate, and analyze these data are critical skills to improve the functioning of urban systems, more effectively design and evaluate policy intervention, and support evidenced-based urban planning and design. While the marketing rhetoric around Smart Cities is replete with unfulfilled promises, and the persistent use (and mis-use) of the term Big Data has generated confusion and distrust around potential applications. Despite this, the reality remains that disruptive shifts in ubiquitous data collection (including mobile devices, GPS, social media, and synoptic video) and the ability to store, manage, and analyze massive datasets require students to have new capabilities that respond to these innovations. * *This course introduces students to computational approaches to urban challenges through the lens of city operations, public policy, and urban planning. Students are exposed to a range of analytical techniques and methods from the perspective of urban decision-making. Issues of city governance, structure, and history are presented to understand how to identify and assess urban problems, collect and organize appropriate data, utilize suitable analytical approaches, and ultimately produce results that recognize the constraints faced by city agencies and policymakers. This is not an easy task, and requires an understanding of urban social and political dynamics and a significant appreciation of data governance, privacy, and ethics. Specific attention is given to domain areas of energy and building efficiency, transportation, public health and emergency response, waste, water, and social connectivity and resilience, as well as the deployment of urban technology at the neighborhood scale. The role of civic engagement and community participation in the context of open data and citizen science is explored, as well as the evolving relationship between, and influence of, informatics on urban governance. Top-down and bottom-up models of innovative service delivery are discussed and debated in the context of public decision-making. Case studies and best practice examples from U.S. and global cities are used extensively, with a particular focus on New York City.*
FLORENCEUGSCA-UA 9280Fall 2017Topics: Black ItaliaThis cross-disciplinary course explores issues of œrace , identity and citizenship in colonial and postcolonial Italy drawing from Sociology, History, Critical Race Theory, Gender Studies and Media and Cultural Studies. There are two sections to this course. The first part will focus on the colonial period and it will provide students with conceptualisations of œrace  in Italy, going from the Liberal to the Fascist period (1861-1941) passing through the colonial mission in East Africa and the creation of the Empire of Africa Orientale Italiana in 1936. The second part of the course will analyse the so called postcolonial phase, going from the end of WWII to contemporary time. In this section we will see, amongst other things, issues of metissage in the early 70 ™s, the immigration phase in the 90 ™s,which marked a historical turning point in the country, and the persistence of the œone drop  rule in modern Italy. The analysis of the rising presence of Black Italians highlights internal tensions at the core of Italian national identity, clearly based on racialising practices. Through the use of sociological research and cultural analysis, this course will offer an extensive overview on the construction and representation of œrace  in Italy and its effects on the everyday life of racialised subjects. Nonetheless, it will also show how these subjects respond to such discourses which racialise and gender their bodies and which they continuously negotiate and/or resist
GALLATINGRADELEC-GG 2705Fall 2017Trauma, Communities, and the Politics of SufferingAlthough diagnoses and discussions of individual trauma have become commonplace, even ubiquitous, collective trauma has not enjoyed the same level of public attention or disciplinary development. One can, however, track the rise of diagnoses of collective trauma over the last several decades, wherein a given community is understood as having been œtraumatized  by a catastrophic event such as genocide or an enduring form of oppression such as extreme poverty. Collective trauma is alternatively referred to as communal, historical, or cultural trauma. This form of trauma is thought to emanate from cultural upheaval and formidable challenges to the social and moral order. This course turns to a variety of theoretical and empirical sources ”ranging from case studies of Holocaust survivors, to critical theories of trauma, to documentary films about First Nation communities and the Rwandan genocide, to 911 Memorial exhibitions, for example ”in order to help map the contours of this emergent discourse and explore some of its social, psychological, and political implications. We will attempt to critically engage this growing tendency to place various modes of communal suffering in the psychological rubric of trauma. What are the differences and points of overlap between individual and collective trauma? To what extent is collective trauma an adequate framework for understanding or responding to communal suffering? And finally, although trauma is often thought to be an œaffliction of the powerless,  how might claiming traumatized status afford certain forms of political power and leverage for the communities in question? We will explore these questions by way of texts such as Didier Fassin and Richard Rechtman ™s The Empire of Trauma, Carol A. Kidron ™s œSurviving a Distant Past: A Case Study of the Cultural Construction of Trauma and Descendant Identity,  and Robben and Suarez-Orozco ™s (eds) Cultures Under Siege: Collective Violence and Trauma, to name a few
GALLATINGRADELEC-GG 2775Fall 2017Bodies at Work: Gender and Labor in ContemporaryVisual CultureHow are women ™s bodies and women ™s labor valued in visual culture today? How are those values related to the value of women ™s bodies and women ™s work historically, both in the public and private spheres? Taking the glamorous figure of the runway model as our point of departure, this course explores the different kinds of labor entailed by the female body ™s insistent commodification across fields of popular cultural production, with an emphasis on the fashion and beauty industries. We will put into dialogue the representational as well as material dimensions of women ™s bodies in fashion, film, art and pop music, interrogating the dominant paradigms that shape female embodiment and bodywork in the 21st century. Students will learn to use political theory, sociology, feminist and media studies literatures to read recent films, ethnographies and journalistic accounts of female bodywork, while weekly current events presentations enrich our discussions. Texts include Hannah Arendt ™s The Human Condition, Linda McDowell ™s Capital Culture, Iris Marion Young ™s On Female Body Experience, and Ashley Mears ™ groundbreaking study of the modeling industry, Pricing Beauty
GALLATINUGFIRST-UG 42Consult CatalogFirst-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar: Capitalism and DemocracyFor many political and economic thinkers, the free market and the private economy are the fundamental building blocks of democratic political systems. Yet activist movements of the past twenty years have been increasingly critical of the ways in which private corporations and the inequality of wealth negatively affect our democracy. This seminar will evaluate different theories of capitalism and consider the ways that thinking about capitalism has changed over time. Is economic inequality a threat to democratic institutions? How does our political system cope—or fail to cope—with large concentrations of private power and wealth? What does it mean to think about economic life from different disciplinary perspectives? Possible readings may include Adam Smith, Max Weber, Nancy Folbre, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow
GALLATINUGFIRST-UG 428Consult CatalogFirst-Year Writing Seminar: Why Black People Tend to ShoutIn a book with an outwardly jokey title, journalist Ralph Wiley offers up some fairly serious views about Why Black People Tend To Shout (1991). “When joy, pain, anger, confusion and frustration, ego and thought, mix it up, the way they do inside black people,” he says, “the uproar is too big to hold inside. The feeling must be aired.” In this course we will consider both the joking and serious import of Wiley’s provocative (but not unproblematic) assertion by drawing on a theoretical framework provided to us by affect studies. Several carefully chosen case studies in black peoples’ shouting draw our attention to the role that “catching feelings” often plays in creating and sustaining notions of community, protest and resistant politics. Readings on a variety of subjects—ring shouts and race riots, black power protests and protest novels, spoken word poetry and prophetic hip hop, the Black Arts movement and Black Lives Matter—are designed to fuel thoughtful and exploratory discussions whose references run the gamut from church ladies hollering “Hallelujah” to Chester Himes’s If He Hollers Let Him Go, to Marvin Gaye’s “Inner City Blues (Makes Me Wanna Holler)” and Tupac Shakur’s “Holler If Ya Hear Me.” In each instance, we will attempt to uncover specific spiritual, political, psychological and aesthetic motives for (or effects of) airing inside feelings in public spaces. Our collective inquiry might provoke some heated—and hilarious—conversations; it will definitely provide us with an opportunity to critically and conscientiously engage key concepts in black cultural studies.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1542Consult CatalogMotown Matrix: Race, Gender & Class Identity In the 1960s Motown Records emerged as a dominant force in American popular music. Billing itself as “The Sound of Young America,” Motown established a lyrical and musical discourse through its records and albums that struck a responsive chord with white and black listeners alike. In this seminar we examine the race, gender and class identity that is inherent in—and emerges from—“The Motown Sound.” How did this company exploit the nationalist pride in the African American community while simultaneously positioning itself as a “crossover” enterprise to whites? What models of business and community did Motown emulate and create? And how did Motown affect the politics and racial discourse of its listeners? Our exploration situates Motown in the Detroit community of the 1950s and 1960s, to understand how it was “imagined,” and its impact on the wider culture. Readings may include excerpts from The Origins of the Urban Crisis by Thomas Sugrue; Where Did Our Love Go? Once in a Great City by David Maraniss; Dancing in the Street by Suzanne E. Smith; Just My Soul Responding by Brian Ward, and Detroit: I Do Mind Dying by Dan Georgakas and Marvin Surkin. The lyrics of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Holland-Dozier-Holland as well as such films as Standing in the Shadows of Motown and Dream Girls may be included.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1586Consult CatalogConsumerism in Comparative PerspectiveConsumerism—the linking of happiness, freedom, and economic prosperity with the purchase and consumption of goods—has long been taken for granted as constitutive of the “good life” in Western societies. Increasingly, global economic shifts have made it possible for some developing countries to engage in patterns of consumption similar to those in the West, such that one quarter of humanity now belongs to the “global consumer class.” At the same time, however, nearly three billion people struggle to survive on less than $2 a day. This course takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to examine consumption in different societies, and we do so by asking several central questions: What are the key determinants of patterns of consumption, and how are they changed or reshaped over time? In turn, how do patterns of consumption shape class formation, racial inequality, identity, aesthetic sensibility, and international boundaries? How do practices of consumption inform the ways in which people understand their values and individuality, imagine success and failure, or conceive happiness? By reading widely in sociology, anthropology, and history we will develop a framework for analyzing the ethical, environmental and social justice implications of consumerism. Readings include case studies from the US, China, India, Europe and Africa Some likely authors include: Keynes, Marx, Marcuse, Benjamin, Mary Douglas, Bill McKibben; Arlie Hochschild, Lizabeth Cohen
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1660Consult CatalogThe Concept of Race in Society and HistoryThis course offers a comparative social and historical analysis of race. Using a wide range of empirical and theoretical materials, we problematize what is too often considered settled: what constitutes race. We challenge the prevailing assumption that race is a biological fact and investigate race as a social construct--one that has changed over time, and varies across societies. A major goal of the course is to understand the mechanisms through which racial domination is (re)produced. We ask questions like: How do systems of racial classification stem from and facilitate patterns of prejudice, discrimination, and segregation? How do those patterns relate to racial violence and even genocide? Why do some societies sanction interracial sex and/or marriage and not others? We read selections from sociology, anthropology, history and literature on ethnoracial division in the US, Western Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. Readings may include works by Stephen Gould, George Fredrickson, Virginia Dominguez, Carl Degler, James Baldwin, Barbara Fields, Pierre Bourdieu, Loic Wacquant, Ann Stoler, Zygmunt Bauman, Dorothy Roberts and Colson Whitehead.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1767Consult CatalogCrime in the USAThe United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This course examines the US criminal justice system, including (i) the causes and consequences of the rising incarceration rates that the nation has witnessed over the past 30 years, and the role of politics in driving society's appetite for locking people up; (ii) the labor market effects of having a prison record, along with the "spill-over" effects that incarceration has on ex-offenders' communities and families; and (iii) the costs borne at the state and federal levels of government. The course explores its subject matter from an interdisciplinary perspective, connecting ideas from economics, political science, sociology, and law. It will combine conceptual and statistical approaches to analysis. Possible texts include Bruce Western, Punishment and Inequality in America; Garland, David, Punishment and Modern Society; Mary Pattillo, David Weiman and Bruce Western, eds., Imprisoning America: The Social Effects of Mass Incarceration; and Norval Morris and David Rothman, The Oxford History of the Prison.
GALLATINUGCORE-GG 2014Consult CatalogProseminar:Globalization: Promises and DiscontentsIn popular and scholarly discourse, the term "globalization" is widely used to put a name to the shape of the contemporary world. In the realms of advertising, policymaking, politics, academia, and everyday talk, "globalization" references the sense that we are now living in a deeply and ever-increasingly interconnected, mobile, and speeded-up world that is unprecedented, fueled by technological innovations and geopolitical and economic transformations. Drawing on perspectives from history, anthropology, cultural and literary studies, geography, political economy, and sociology, this course will explore theories, discourses, and experiences of globalization. Running through the course are three central concerns: 1) exploring claims about the "new-ness" of globalization from historical perspectives, 2) examining how a variety of social and cultural worlds mediate globalization and 3) analyzing a contested politics of globalization in which the opportunities for social mobility and transformation are pitted against renewed intensifications of exploitation and vulnerability along long-standing vectors of difference and inequality. While "globalization" is often touted as a "flattening" of the world, this course moves beyond such clichés to understand the intersection between large-scale transformations in political economy and culture in and through multiple cultural worlds situated unevenly on the world's map.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1518Consult CatalogGlobalization: Promises and DiscontentsIn popular and scholarly discourse, the term ?globalization? is widely used to put a name to the shape of the contemporary world. In the realms of advertising, policymaking, politics, academia, and everyday talk, ?globalization? references the sense that we are now living in a deeply and ever-increasingly interconnected, mobile, and speeded-up world that is unprecedented, fueled by technological innovations and geopolitical and economic transformations. Often, globalization is presumed to be not only an intrinsically new economic, cultural and technological force, but also one originating in the West and ushering cultural homogenization throughout the world. Drawing on perspectives from history, anthropology, cultural and literary studies, geography, political economy, and sociology, this course will critically examine such presumptions and explore theories, discourses, and experiences of globalization. Running through the course are three central concerns: 1) exploring claims about the novelty of globalization from historical perspectives, 2) examining the variety of ways in which social and cultural worlds mediate globalization and the multiple routes it can take, and 3) analyzing a contested politics of globalization in which the opportunities for social mobility and transformation are pitted against renewed intensifications of exploitation and vulnerability along long-standing vectors of difference and inequality. While ?globalization? is often touted as a ?flattening? of the world, this course moves beyond such clichs to understand the intersection between large-scale transformations in political economy and culture in and through multiple cultural worlds situated unevenly on the world?s map. Readings may include Friction: An Ethnography of Global Connection by Anna Tsing; High Tech and High Heels in the Global Economy: Women, Work and Pink-Collar Identities in the Caribbean by Carla Freeman; In An Antique Land: History in the Guise of a Traveler?s Tale by Amitav Ghosh; The Modern Girl Around the World: Consumption, Modernity and Globalization, Weinbaum et al., eds.; and Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History by Sidney M. Mintz.
GALLATINUGWRTNG-UG 1120Fall 2017The Southern Table: Place, Politics, Memory & Mythology in Foods of the American SouthThere is perhaps no region in America as valorized and contested, romanticized and politically polarizing as the South. In contemporary American food culture, the South has come to represent a number of aesthetic ideals including authenticity, craftsmanship and the particularities of place. Many even go so far as to argue that the foods of the South make up the only œtrue  American cuisine. Why the South? What elements of the region ™s unique history inform this contemporary mindset, and what can we learn from today ™s œNew Southern  table about identity, politics, history and progress? How can studying the food of the South help us understand the popular mythology of our country as a whole? In this course, we will read both scholarly and popular literature as well as watch and listen to various materials that dig into Southern food culture. We will tease apart what is so unique about the region and its pockets of vernacular cuisine, both in reality and in imagination. By putting Southern food under the magnifying glass, we will tease apart how various forms of media engage with historical and contemporary issues of race, class and gender by continually asking: Who is credited with œinventing  the cuisines of the American South? From whence do signature Southern ingredients really hail, and who has prepared them? How have branding, advertising, cookbooks and television massaged the Southern narrative in order to serve and perpetuate the romantic ideals of the Old South? And in today ™s œNew South,  who is invited to, and who is still excluded from, the Southern table, both in reality and in popular narratives? In this unique moment of Southern food ™s surge in popularity, we will pen our own stories about how the South is translated and represented gastronomically in our own locale, New York City.
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1486Fall 2017RevolucionEquating Latin America and revolution seems almost a truism. From Zapata to "Ché" to Chávez, the region's modern history is a tale of one movement promising epic change to the next, each more dramatic than the last and collectively giving rise to an image of Latin America as a cradle of firebrand leaders and riotous masses leaving in their wake endless cycles of unrest. But to look deeper into this history is to find a world of complexity, of peoples pursuing radical change but also gradual reform, at times taking up ballots and at times taking up arms, at times in the factory and at times on the farm, at times from the left and at times from the right. All of it "revolución," yes, but what kind? And through what means? And for what ends? And at what cost? This course traces the evolution of revolution in twentieth century Latin America, from the final collapse of Spanish colonialism in 1898 to the rise of chavismo in 1998, and finally considers the impact of this history on Latin America today. Authors may include, among others, Mariano Azuela, Eva Perón, Gustavo Gutierrez, Subcomandante Marcos, and Raul Zibech
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1523Fall 2017Feminism, Empire and PostcolonialityJamaica Kincaid once said, œI now consider anger as a badge of honor. [It is] the first step to claiming yourself.  Anger, rather than Betty Friedan ™s œproblem that has no name,  has haunted the life of many women whose negotiations of the meaning of gender, race and sexuality are marked by the violence of colonial-imperial encounters. Accordingly, this course examines the following questions: How have colonial-imperial encounters shaped the imagination of gender, race and sexuality? How have women built feminist solidarities amidst, or perhaps based on, the shared experience of violence and anger? In turn, how has the imagination of gender, race and sexuality redefined the histories of colonies and empires? To pursue these questions, course readings include literary and other scholarly texts engaging feminist and postcolonial theory. Readings range from Kincaid ™s The Autobiography of My Mother and Rigoberta Menchú ™s I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala to other texts by scholars like Uma Narayan, Patricia Mohammed, Vandana Shiva, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Ann Stoler
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1555Fall 2017Imagining India: From The Colonial to the GlobalIndia is a crucial site for discussions about globalization within the US and beyond. While some discourses fearfully worry about the loss of American jobs to outsourcing within India, other discourses herald œIndia Rising  to take its place among powerful global players. Drawing on an interdisciplinary set of readings about India, this course explores how the liberalization of the Indian economy and the forces of globalization are transforming the fraught and difficult emergence, out of colonial domination, of the nation-state of India. First, we explore a variety of pre-colonial and colonial imaginings of South Asia and examine politicized assertions of a unified Indian identity during the anti-colonial nationalist movement. Here, nation is not only a political entity, but also a cultural project that re-shapes ideas of self, religion, community, region, family, gender and kinship. The post-independence period is explored through writings on the Partition that created India and Pakistan, œdevelopment  as a key concept that has been central to nation-building, and struggles around caste, gender, sexuality, tribal identity, environment, region and religion. How the state contends with majority and minority identities and claims, the complexities of secularism, notions of equality and difference, all in the context of vibrant social movements and a large NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) sector will enable an in-depth exploration of how democracy, as idea and practice, happens in India. Having explored the cultural and political project of modern nation-state formation within India, we will then explore how globalization is transforming politics, economy and culture. Readings include: Ronald Inden ™s Imagining India, Amitav Ghosh on the Indian Ocean World, Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy by Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, the writings of Gandhi, Nehru, and Amdedkar, subaltern studies collective writings on nationalism in India, The Nation and its Fragments by Partha Chatterjee, Manu Joseph ™s Serious Men, Menon and Bhasin ™s Borders and Boundaries: Women in India ™s Partition and India ™s New Middle Class: Democratic Politics in an Era of Economic Reform by Leela Fernandes
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1632Fall 2017"Woman" and the Political Feminist theorists have critiqued the canonical works of political theory as implicitly (and sometimes explicitly) premised on the exclusion of œwoman  and the œfeminine.  The œfeminine  (private, domestic, passive) has been seen to be in opposition to the œmasculine  political sphere (active, public, rational). In this course we will read works from the canon of political theory alongside feminist critiques. The question we will consider is: how does feminist critiques of the absence of œwoman  and the œfeminine  in discourses of the political affect our ideas of not only the private and public, but also those of citizenship, equality, freedom, the individual, and community? Readings may include Plato, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Locke, Marx, Arendt, Susan Okin, Luce Irigaray, Linda Zerilli, Carole Pateman, and Bonnie Honig
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1849Fall 2017Black Lives Matter: Race, Media, and Popular Protest The age of the Obama Presidency has been burdened by a number of highly publicized police cases involving the killings of unarmed black citizens at the hands of law enforcement and/or local vigilantes. In the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown, Sandra Bland, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, 7-year-old Aiyana Stanley-Jones, and others, the recent #BlackLivesMatter movement has emerged largely in response to histories of state sanctioned violence against black and brown bodies. This seminar links the #blacklivesmatter  movement to four broader phenomena: 1) the rise of the U.S. prison industrial complex and the increasing militarization of inner city communities, 2) the role of media in influencing national conversations about race and racism, 3) the state of racial justice activism in the purportedly œpost-racial  Obama Presidency, and 4) the increasingly populist nature of decentralized protest movements in the U.S. We will debate and engage with a variety of topics, including the moral ethics of œlooting  and riotous forms of protest; violent vs. nonviolent civil disobedience; the media myth of œblack on black  crime; coalitional politics and the black feminist and LGBTQ underpinnings of the #blacklivesmatter movement; and comparisons between the blacklivesmatter movement and the U.S. civil rights movement. Our course will likely include in-person visits from any prominent activists in the movement such as Dr. Cornel West, #BlackLivesMatter co-founder Alicia Garza, mayoral candidate Deray McKesson, and members of the New York City chapter of Black Lives Matter
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1879Fall 2017Subversion & Perversion: Queer CritiqueThis seminar focuses on queer critique, and we will rely on critique as an ethos or practice that questions and explores the given order of things, rather than functioning as a kind of criticism that intends to expose error. We will find instead that critique puts us, our bodies and our desires, very vividly at stake. Over the course of the semester we will study Foucault, Butler, Wojnarowicz, Rivera and others, in particular attending to their accounts of power in order that we might better comprehend how power can both produce and constrain us, differentiate and mobilize us. We will also read widely from the recent and politically urgent work of queer of color critique (Muñoz, Ferguson, Reddy, and Chen) in order to ask after other and dissident and diverse ways of being, doing and thinking in common. While this course does not have formal prerequisites, some familiarity with queer theory or critical race theory is strongly advised. Our texts will include film, art, memoir, theory and manifesto; speculating where those genres begin, end, and overlap will be one of our tasks
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1886Fall 2017Imagining JusticeCultural work is political imagining. This course asks just where the picture of a just world comes from. The common link between recent political movements like Occupy, Black Lives Matter, contemporary radical feminisms and queer politics is the claim that justice is not for everyone. Through events, actions and statements, movements urge us to see who is left out of the collective imagination of a just world. The creative work of our culture, as much as much as any political document or decree, teaches us what justice is and whom it is for. This means that it is crucial for us to examine how novels, film, exhibitions, memorials and events represent histories of political change and the achievement of justice. Our time is ripe for this exploration, since in the last few years we have been inundated with work in many genres that represent the anniversaries of the Civil Rights Movement, the Women ™s Rights Movement, LGBTQ movements and more. Who do these narratives teach us that justice is for, and what happens to those who fall out of their view? We will investigate a range of texts, considering how they uphold or limit forms of justice and also how they intervene against those limits. A range of primary and secondary texts might include Morrison's Beloved, Walker's Meridian, Baldwin's The Fire Next Time, Coates's Between the World and Me, and the recent films Selma and 12 Years a Slave
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1888Fall 2017Deconstructing the Wall: A Critical Examination of Current Issues in EducationThis course will explore foundational philosophies of education and theories of learning to develop a vocabulary by which we can examine current controversies and debates about education in both K-12 and higher education. We will begin with core texts addressing the purpose of education in a democratic society, then analyze education sociologically, through questions like: Does education reproduce class divisions or enable social mobility? And more broadly, does education simply reproduce dominant social norms or does it enable social change? We will then engage modern texts drawing heavily from critical pedagogists, to examine contemporary issues in education, including the corporatization of schooling, the charter school movement, the relationship between poverty and educational access, the recently passed Every Student Succeeds Act and the new Secretary of Education, high-stakes testing, freedom of expression and diversity on college campuses, and the concept of school safety in its many forms. In turn, students will be able reflect on and critically engage their own educations and academic choices, while seeing the legal and political elements involved in determining the goals of education, what students are required to learn, and how the resources for learning are defined and distributed. Readings for this course may include Dewey, Freire, hooks, Kozol, and Spring, as well as work by Adler, Darling-Hammonds, Giroux, Greene, Hirsch, Noddings, Sartre, and Tatum
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1928Fall 2017Theorizing ImpasseThe goal of this course is to explore the idea that American life is œstuck,  because people are gripped by structures of power, patterns of conduct, and genres of narrative that they seem unable to reflect on or change. Major versions of what might be called œimpasse talk  depict the hegemony of neo-liberalism, the intractability of white supremacy, or the impossibility of forestalling climate catastrophe because of pervasive investment in economic growth. Globalization, political economy, the two-party system, the racial state, sexual violence and patriarchy, homophobia or hetero-normativity, are depicted recurrently in academic theory as irremediably set in concrete, or open only to incremental rather than fundamental change. How do we assess such claims about the impossibility -or plausibility- of radical change? How do we assess purported distinctions between radical change and mere reform? When does contesting a claim of impasse mean we are disavowing a reality we must instead acknowledge? When is a claim of impasse a self-defeating investment in paralysis? We will explore these questions by arranging theoretical and literary texts in units around race, neo-liberalism, hetero-normativity, and patterns of American political rhetoric, each unit relating claims of impasse to on-the-ground politics
GALLATINUGIDSEM-UG 1937Fall 2017Underground Alien Outsider Queer: Black Culture at the MarginsUnderground Alien Outsider Queer: Black Culture at the Margins is a seminar in which we will consider the long association of each of the title adjectives with the experience of social marginality, political insecurity and existential anxiety. Our aim is to explore whether and how non-belonging inspires (and requires) alternative, transformative, creative, even subversive, approaches to subjectivity and society. This seminar is aggressively interdisciplinary and eclectic, drawing from black studies, cultural studies, performance studies, and sexuality studies, and students should be prepared to critically engage history, literature, philosophy, art, music and film texts. We will wend our way through topics as varied as fugitive slave laws and avant-garde jazz, existentialism and afrofuturism, punk music and Pariah; we analyze works by Bruce Nugent, George Schuyler, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Thelonious Monk, James Baldwin, Sun Ra, Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Thornton Dial. Our readings and discussions will provide us with an occasion to think about new and unexpected ways ”underground alien outsider queer ways ”of appreciating and studying black culture
GALLATINUGFIRST-UG 419Fall 2017First-Year Writing Seminar: Disability Arts & CultureSince its relatively recent inception, disability studies has worked to disentangle individual physical and psychological impairments from disability as a social construct. Like other identity-based, liberation-movement critical endeavors, the field has increasingly turned its attention to artistic representations of disability in order to more closely examine how disabled subjectivity emerges through and in spite of stigma and marginalizing social policies. This turn has prompted a series of questions: What is disability art? Does the answer lie in the aesthetic object or in the creative subject? Do disabled artists necessarily produce disability art? Can and should non-disabled subjects produce disability art? To whom does the disabled artist address herself? Taking these queries in another direction, why has our culture long imagined a link between disability ”particularly mental illness ”and creativity? Are all artists disabled? Is all art disability art? What does this generalization reveal, what does it conceal? These are some of the questions governing our course, the aim of which is to provide an introduction to disability studies vis-­à­-vis the arts. To that end, we will focus on works by contemporary disabled artists, especially representations of illness and disability in life writing, sign language poetry, visual art, music and drama. These artists will include Georgina Kleege, Jean­-Dominique Bauby, Lucy Grealy, William Styron, Gerardo Nigenda, Peter Cook, Christophe Pillault, among others. We will supplement this material by reading theoretical texts emerging from disability, cultural and literary studies, as well as narrative medicine and expressive therapy
GALLATINUGFIRST-UG 420Fall 2017First-Year Writing Sem: The Politics of Home: Gender, Race, Class and KinshipThe premise of this seminar is that the œhome  is not prepolitical or apolitical, in opposition to the public domain, but inextricably linked to the political. Indeed meanings of home saturate “ sometimes explicitly, sometimes obliquely “ our public discourse and debates. Gender, race, class, and sexuality are publically policed and reproduced with reference to normative familial relations and (private) property. Yet domestic spaces and intimate lives can often serve as spaces of relief, refuge, and even political opposition. The home, depending on where one finds oneself situated, can mean wildly different things: prison or refuge, the banal or the aspirational. In this course we will read critiques and adulations of the domestic in multiple genres (theoretical, literary, popular) alongside contemporary activist projects and artworks that willfully put the domestic on public display through the use of traditional women ™s work (knitting, embroidery, sewing). We will ask how different domestic spaces and intimate relations are imagined in opposition (or conjunction) with dominant models. Readings will include Charlotte Gilman Perkins, Betty Friedan, Toni Morrison, bell hooks, Kathleen Stewart, Ann Cvetkovich, David Eng, Juana Maria Rodriguez, and Foucault and artworks by Annette Messager, Marianne Jørgensen, and the Gees Bend Quilters
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2110-02Fall 2017Health Care PolicyThis course introduces students to key concepts, principles and practices in the field of health policy and management. The course will examine issues that concern quality, costs, access to healthcare and public health services for individuals and populations. The course emphasizes the need for leaders in today ™s world of public health to understand central issues in both policy and management and, importantly, how these interact. The overall goal of the course is to provide information for students to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in health policy and management and to provide a foundation for practice in a range of careers in public health and health care policy and management.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2115Fall 2017Introduction to Principles of Nutrition in Public HealthThis course will cover the basic concepts of the science of nutrition detailing the nutrients, food sources, function and nutritional requirements. The course will integrate the nutritional needs of populations, both nationally and globally, with emphasis on undernutrition, over nutrition and the double burden of malnutrition. The principles of nutritional needs will be applied to promoting health in vulnerable populations.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2120Fall 2017Foundation of Global HealthThis course prepares students to critically examine public health issues from a global perspective. It will help you to understand how processes of socioeconomic development and globalization influence the health of populations throughout the world. This course prepares students to critically examine public health issues from a global perspective. It will present the state of the art in addressing global health problems, and introduce you to the primary actors involved in setting global health policies and in developing global health programs and services. The course will also touch upon the ethical dimensions of global public health, including conflicts between individuals, communities, and nations. The course is organized around four modules, three of which (Governance, Health Threats, & Opportunities), provide a critical lens for understanding global health today, and a fourth (Skills Building) that provides an introduction to the leadership skill sets required to address them.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2140Fall 2017Global Issues in Social and Behavioral HealthThis core course examines social, psychological and cultural factors that have an impact on public health in community, national and global contexts. These factors may include: population characteristics (social class, age, gender, culture, race/ethnicity), individual beliefs and behaviors, and socio-political systems and policies that affect public health problems and their solutions. Theories and perspectives drawn from sociology, anthropology, and psychology are applied to critical issues in global public health including the AIDs epidemic, mental illness, chronic disease, community violence, war and natural disaster trauma as well as behavioral health problems such as smoking and substance abuse.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2153Fall 2017Global Environmental HealthEnvironmental health sciences represent the study of biological, physical, and chemical agents that affect the health of both communities and workers. This course provides students with an introduction to key areas of environmental health. Students gain an understanding of the interaction of individuals and communities with their environment, the impact of environmental agents on human health, and specific applications of concepts of environmental health including exposure assessment and engineering controls. The impact of global environmental issues on health equity will be considered, as well as scientific, political, legal, and economic perspectives on global environmental health. Emphasis is placed on issues in environmental health that transcend national boundaries.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2218Fall 2017Assessing Community Health NeedsCommunity health assessments comprehensively identify the assets and needs of a defined group. When conducted in tandem with community members, community health assessments provide a window into how a community sees itself, the systems and patterns it functions by, and its assets and needs. Public health practitioners can use this information to work with a community to utilize its strengths to address mutually acknowledged needs. In this course, students will work in teams to conduct a community assessment of an assigned United Health Fund district within New York City. The focus of the course will be on introducing the basic content/skills of on-the-ground field research, collecting, analyzing, and summarizing data
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2250Fall 2017Health and Human RightsThis course approaches global health and justice from international human rights and humanitarian law. The course is designed to provide public policy and public health students with the basis for literacy about human rights and humanitarian law. Through lectures, case studies and practical training, students will be able to gain knowledge and skills to determine how rights violations impact health, and how to engage in using the human rights approach to improve health outcomes. Topics, including HIV/AIDS, sexual and reproductive rights, the right to health in war and disasters, access to medicines and the ethical obligations of public health professionals, will be used to illustrate practical applications of human rights to global health.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2312Fall 2017Global Perspectives on Reproductive Health & Human RightsThis course examines reproductive health from a human rights perspective both nationally and internationally. After a review of the intersection of reproductive health and human rights, topics to be covered include: the demographic transition and declining birth rates; the rights of women with HIV infection and other vulnerable populations; men ™s influence on reproductive rights; viewing traditional practices through a human rights lens; and current reproductive rights in the USA
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHGRADGPH-GU 2315Fall 2017Global Health and Economic DevelopmentThis course engages students in assessing, describing, selecting and evaluating community-based health interventions to reduce health risks among individuals and communities, and to improve population health. It considers different definitions of community, a critical review of the evidence base, and identifies key elements and theories that underlie community-based public health interventions. Students examine a number of public health interventions addressing current health issues in the U.S. today, focusing on factors influencing the design of interventions, thE choice of strategies selected, methods for assessing the magnitude of change effected by the intervention, and ethical and political issues raised by the interventions.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHUGGPH-GU 2140Consult CatalogGlobal Issues in Social & Behavioral HealthThis core course examines social, psychological and cultural factors that have an impact on public health in community, national and global contexts. These factors may include: population characteristics (social class, age, gender, culture, race/ethnicity), individual beliefs and behaviors, and socio-political systems and policies that affect public health problems and their solutions. Theories and perspectives drawn from sociology, anthropology, and psychology are applied to critical issues in global public health including the AIDs epidemic, mental illness, chronic disease, community violence, war and natural disaster trauma as well as behavioral health problems such as smoking and substance abuse.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHUGUGPH-GU 10Fall 2017Health and Society in a Global ContextThis course examines social, behavioral and cultural factors that have an impact on public health in community, national and global contexts. We will consider how health is influenced by factors such as age, gender, culture, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, and social class. Public health problems and their solutions will be analyzed in light of individual risk factors as well as larger structural forces.
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHUGUGPH-GU 40Fall 2017Health Policy in a Global WorldThis course introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Using a comparative lens, students explore organization, financing and delivery of health care services and health systems around the world. We examine the role of governmental and non-governmental agencies in delivering care and contributing to a health care infrastructure using case studies and other materials in a comparative approach. Key lessons in the implementation of new health policies and initiatives are explored across the developing world, as well as in a US as students explore health system performance, the quality and cost of care, the management of health care services, the process of health improvement and health reform. The course will use a multidisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economics, and ethical perspectives. The objective is to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in global health policy and management and to provide a foundation for future studies and careers in the global health field. Epidemiology in a Global World and Health and Society in a Global Context are recommended but not required pre-requisites for the course
GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTHUGUGPH-GU 45Fall 2017Controversies and DebatesThe provocative controversy as to whether New York City should ban sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces to lower rates of obesity and diabetes is merely the latest example of the ongoing historical debate over how we should be best protect the public's health while respecting civil liberties. Modern public health began with the sanitation movement in England in the mid-nineteenth century. Since then, health officials have instituted mandatory vaccine programs, detained infectious patients and passed laws to limit smoking, change people's diets and mandate traffic safety measures. Despite the improved health that these measures have helped to produce, industry, politicians and libertarian critics have opposed aspects of these initiatives using the mantle of preserving civil rights. This class will use primary and secondary written documents as well as public-service announcements, movies and documentaries to explore how these issues have been characterized and debated in the United States over the past 150 years. Have specific groups in society been unfairly stigmatized by public health efforts? Do we have the right to compel "better" behaviors if people are only hurting themselves and not others? Did health officials deliberately exaggerate the dangers of "second-hand smoke" to get stricter anti-smoking laws passed? Why do we call drunk driving crashes "accidents" when the behavior of drunk drivers is not at all accidental? How well, from a policy and ethical standpoint, did health officials handle the recent outbreak of Ebola? This course will be multidisciplinary in its attention not only to modern public health debates and their historical precedents but also to the ethical and medical issues raised.
GSASGRADHIST-GA 1809Consult CatalogSlavery, Colonialism & Revolution in The CaribbeanIntroduction to the major themes and debates of colonial Caribbean history. Begins with the reading of general works on the Caribbean: selections from major texts and classic essays by historians, anthropologists, and literary critics arguing the case for the study of the Caribbean as a unit of analysis. From there, goes on to consider the central themes of the region and the period: slavery, capitalism, and emancipation; colonialism, revolution, and imperialism; nationalism and race. Themes are studied from a variety of approaches and perspectives, from very local microhistorical studies to comparative ones to more sweeping global treatments. Throughout, an attempt is mIntroduction to the major themes and debates of colonial Caribbean history. Begins with the reading of general works on the Caribbean: selections from major texts and classic essays by historians, anthropologists, and literary critics arguing the case for the study of the Caribbean as a unit of analysis. From there, goes on to consider the central themes of the region and the period: slavery, capitalism, and emancipation; colonialism, revolution, and imperialism; nationalism and race. Themes are studied from a variety of approaches and perspectives, from very local microhistorical studies to comparative ones to more sweeping global treatments. Throughout, an attempt is made to bridge the vertical lines that often separate the study of the different linguistic and imperial Caribbeans.
GSASGRADANTH-GA 1213Consult CatalogPrehistoric Europe IISurveys the archaeology of temperate Europe from the end of the Ice Age to the arrival of the Romans. Topics include Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and post-Pleistocene adaptations; the origins of agriculture in Europe; the development of metal technology; the emergence of social inequality; and the beginnings of urbanism in the later Iron Age.
GSASGRADANTH-GA 1315Consult CatalogEthnographic Traditions: East AsiaTraditional societies and contemporary problems of how traditional beliefs and behavior have been modified by modern changes. Topics: caste system and theories of inequality; world religions (Buddhism and Islam) as locally received; the impact of cash economy and markets on subsistence agriculture; the relation of religious beliefs to family and community structure; national culture and the international demands of industry, bureaucracy, and education. Includes Thailand, Indonesia, China, and Japan.
GSASGRADANTH-GA 2346Consult CatalogSex and GenderImplications of new research on gender for anthropological models of society and culture and for theories concerning production, wealth, and exchange; stratification, domination, and inequality; kinship and family roles; and the role of gender constructs in cultural ideologies.
GSASGRADECON-GA 1108Consult CatalogIncome Distribution in U.S.Surveys theories of income distribution and empirical evidence for the United States. The first part gives a historical overview of inequality in the United States in the 20th century. Human capital, Marxism, internal labor market, dual labor market, and structural theories of income inequality are then surveyed along with their supporting evidence. Also covered are topics on screening, ability and earnings, discrimination, and growth and inequality.
GSASGRADPOL-GA 1350Consult CatalogAmerican Politics: The Domestic Pols of U.S. IBroad overview of important topics in the study of the domestic politics in the United States. Examines in depth the analysis and merits of a selection of contemporary research on political participation, mass opinion, elections, legislative politics, interbranch relations, bureaucratic politics, judicial politics, federalism, inequality, and the role of money in politics. Course goals are to (1) introduce students to important controversies in the study of American domestic politics and (2) encourage students to think rigorously about the process of conducting political research
GSASGRADSOC-GA 2137Consult CatalogSocial StratificationAssesses the research and theoretical work on economic inequality and classes in the social sciences. Reviews important classic contributions (including Marx, Weber, and Schumpeter), compares competing approaches (including Marxist, conflict, functionalist, elite, and status attainment theories), and surveys modern directions of development (such as labor market studies, socialist inequality, the role of the state).
GSASGRADHIST-GA 1527Fall 2017Topics in History The Long Struggle for Racial Equality in the US——
GSASGRADMSMS-GA 1500Fall 2017History and Theory of MuseumsIntroduction to the social, cultural, and political history of museums. This course focuses on the formation of the modern museum with an emphasis on the U.S. context. Museums of natural history, anthropology, science, technology, history, and art are addressed from a variety of disciplinary approaches that explore the institution and its practices with respect to governance, colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, ethnicity, and community. FreqIntroduction to the social, cultural, and political history of museums. This course focuses on the formation of the modern museum with an emphasis on the U.S. context. Museums of natural history, anthropology, science, technology, history, and art are addressed from a variety of disciplinary approaches that explore the institution and its practices with respect to governance, colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, ethnicity, and community. Frequent visits to New York museums are required, along with weekly writing assignments, and a final paper
GSASGRADEURO-GA 2670Fall 2017A Modern Mediterranean Region: Myth or RealityThis course draws on contemporary events in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, to discuss key issues of the history of the twentieth-century Mediterranean. Films and film documentaries will introduce debates on colonialism, postcolonialism, and war; democracy and dictatorship; revolution, political dissent, and human rights; migration, gender, and racism.
LIBERAL STUDIESUGAFGC-UF 101Fall 2017African CulturesThis course introduces the great diversity of peoples, places, and cultures in the African continent. Students use a variety of sources, historical texts, literature, and film to explore the paradigms of traditional cultures of pre-colonial societies, and the disruptions of those structures by the incursions of Islam and European colonialism. The course also explores the decolonization of the continent with its attendant struggles for independence, and post-liberation problems. Modernity ™s impact on cultural roles and the transformation of African cultures in the Diaspora may also receive attention
LIBERAL STUDIESUGCAGC-UF 101Fall 2017Caribbean CulturesIslands in the Caribbean archipelago have been variously characterized as paradisical, the sites of wealth-producing plantations, the ideal Spring Break destination, even as staging posts for narcotics traders. Caribbean landscapes function as metaphor, emblem, symbol, or even characters. Landscape “ and geography - is implicated in the ways the identities of Caribbean states have been influenced by an accumulation of images, cultivated primarily by non-Caribbean individuals and agencies, including Columbus' journal entries, the documentation of European colonial governments and settlers, the brochures travel agents and the fantasies of tourists. Often in conflict with the fantasy projections of others, Caribbean peoples face the ongoing challenge of reclaiming their islands and building their societies, still haunted by histories of slavery and colonialism, while still subjected to multiple forms of commodification, consumption and economic domination. Based on readings from literature, history and cultural studies, this course takes an interdisciplinary, transnational approach to unpacking connections between the histories of slavery, indentureship and European colonialism and the Caribbean's current realities of inequality, internally “ in particular inequalities of race and gender - and in its economic relations with the West. Questions addressed include: How have the residual legacies of slavery and colonization facilitated consumption in and of the Caribbean? And what cultural resources and strengths are deployed or lost to migration
LIBERAL STUDIESUGEAGC-UF 101Fall 2017East Asian CulturesThis course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and Korea. Aspects of East Asia?s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area?s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural This course introduces East Asian cultures, focusing to a greater or lesser extent on China, Japan, and Korea. Aspects of East Asia?s traditional and modern culture are presented by study of some of the area?s Great Books, as well as other literary, political, philosophical, religious and/or artistic works from the traditional, modern, or contemporary periods. Issues raised may include national or cultural identity in relation to colonialism/imperialism, East-West tensions, modernism?s clash with tradition, the persistence of tradition with the modern, the East Asian Diaspora, and the question of East Asian modernities
LIBERAL STUDIESUGMEGC-UF 101Fall 2017Middle Eastern CulturesThis course offers a general, interdisciplinary introduction to the societies, cultures, politics, and history of the contemporary Middle East and Islamic North Africa. Texts on sociological, historical and political topics, as well as artistic expressions, films, and literary works may be employed to examine the region?s rich historical legacy and current complexity. Topics may include the historical and cultural relations between the Middle East and the West: the impact of historical, economic, and political change on the region?s cultures and societies, and the contemporary state of the region
LIBERAL STUDIESUGSAGC-UF 101Fall 2017South Asian CulturesThis course provides a broad understanding of the social developments of the Indian sub-continent. The countries studied may include India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and/or Sri Lanka. Coverage may focus on the pre-modern, modern and/or contemporary aspects of the region?s experiences, which span thousands of years. A variety of materials, from fictional and non-fictional texts to video and film may be used to explore the interactions of tradition and change in different time periods, and to illuminate such issues as colonialism, sectarianism, and modernization
LONDONUGSCA-UA 9115Fall 2017Black Urban StudiesThis course negotiates the complex range of influences that construct black culture and identity in Britain today from socio-cultural, historical, geo-political and aesthetic standpoints. The changing conceptions of Black British identity (and its detractors), is explored in a cross-disciplinary curriculum which attempts to straddle the perhaps irresolvable division between the recognition of cultural differences and the refusal of marginalization, as played out in the urban context, namely London. Key areas of investigation include: representation via literature, drama, film, television, music, sport and the visual arts and the ways in which these areas are shaped by and shape black citizens ™ experiences of society ™s institutions through the media, education, criminal justice system and the arts. As an indicative rather than definitive hold-all, or framing device, the use of the term ˜Black British ™ follows the Parekh Report ™s lead, that ˜belonging is about full acceptance, being recognized as an integral part of the community ™ (2000:54). The course assumes automatic cultural constituency for indigenous black Britons as they belong to and contribute distinctively to contemporary society. It moves beyond centring inheritance in terms of the immigrant or arrivalist sensibility in order to explore Britain ™s unique manifestation of the African diaspora as sited firmly within contemporary Europe. The breadth of the course aims to: introduce students to cultural criticism and theory, apply this to Black Urban Studies in the British context and encourage research into a wider range of questions that will arise from investigating the above
MADRIDUGANTH-UA 9255Fall 2017Migration and Cultural Diversity in Spain: Anthropological Approaches (In Spanish)Migration and Cultural Diversity in Spain analyzes current migratory flows and their implications, one of the key topics in Spain and the European Union today. This course explores anthropological approaches to developing theoretical and analytical frameworks for understanding the diversity and complexity of migrations and their effects on society and culture.
NURSINGGRADNURSE-GN 2032Fall 2017Nursing Strategies: Infancy, Childhood and AdolescenceThis course examines theoretical concepts, research evidence, and learning models related to growth and developmental patterns experienced by children and adolescents, as well as their application to primary care settings. Interventions by advanced practice nurses that promote optimal health and well-being are applied to commonly encountered issues of growth and development throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Social, political, cultural, and legal-ethical issues that influence growth and development and health care are explored. A clinical component allows the student to apply theoretical foundations in clinical settings.
NURSINGGRADNURSE-GN 2068Fall 2017Substance Use DisordersThis course focuses on the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of outcomes for people with substance use related disorders. Target populations include individuals of all ages diagnosed with medical or mental health disorders, at risk for, or who suffer from, an acute or chronic substance use related disorder. Major classes of substances used by these populations will be presented. Culturally relevant, evidence based practice frameworks are presented. Systems of care delivery are analyzed for economic, ethical, cultural, and political factors that influence care delivery to populations seeking treatment for substance use related disorders
NURSINGUGNURSE-UN 1248Fall 2017Contemporary Issues in Health Care45 hours: 3 credits. This course will explore current issues in the evolution of patient care in contemporary health care systems. Embedded in the human experience of illness and health are rich sub-concepts with ethical and moral implications such as comfort and suffering, genetics/genomics, bioethics, addiction, culture and healthcare disparities, LGBT healthcare needs, interprofessional collaboration, global health issues, and policy. Ethics is an essential component of nursing practice and is inextricably linked to quality care. Students will be challenged to think critically and ethically about what society considers fair and just care as they explore factors that influence the wellness-illness continuum of human experiences. Discussions will focus on a variety of sources and formats to include: case studies, selected evidence-based articles, care protocols, contemporary editorials, film and student opinions. Students will use evidence-based sources, to discuss scientific and technological advances that are creating unprecedented opportunities, choices, and consequences that are inevitable when illness and health care intersect
NURSINGUGNURSE-UN 1305Fall 2017Global Perspectives on Women's HealthThis course examines the major social, cultural, economic, political and environmental forces affecting the health, well-being and human rights of women around the world. Major health risks and problems as well as health disparities and access to care will be explored. National, international, global and philanthropic organizations and their impact on the women ™s issues will be examined
PARISUGFREN-UA 9903Fall 2017France: Gender, Class, RaceAiming to enlarge our understanding of the profound transformations of contemporary France, this course focuses first on the redeployment of identities: sex and gender, age and generation, social affiliation, ethnicity, before examining some of the profound shifts in social, economic, cultural, political and demographic factors that have transpired as a result. We will examine the way these changes have been constructed through various ideological and cultural representations, in order to deepen such notions as the crisis of the model of integration, the aging of the population, the decline in the emancipation of women, the breakdown of social mobility, the break-up of elites, and so on -- all points of entry for understanding the crisis of a "French model" in full mutation. In French
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESGRADGLOB1-GC 2240Fall 2017International Human Rights: Laws, Mechanisms, and PracticesInternational human rights are not vague concepts of justice. They are precisely defined international laws, stemming from a series of international treaties and overseen by a complex of United Nations and other mechanisms. This course provides an introduction to international human rights laws (including special laws for the protection of children, women, racial minorities, and other groups); an explanation of the international procedures for overseeing their protection; and the methods used by NGOs in human rights advocacy. Particular attention is paid to international economic, social, and cultural rights, including the human rights to food, health, housing, education, and work
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUGGLOB1-GC 2390Consult CatalogGender, Politics and the State in DevelopmentThe demise of the Soviet Union and its empire, the legacy of colonialism, resurgent nationalism and new non-state actors have given rise to a period of complexity and rapid change in international relations. The academic debate reflects this uncertainty, with contending theories about what constitutes power in the post cold war environment, how to identify the basic units of international affairs, the nature of globalization, the utility and legitimacy of the use of force, the dynamics of the balance of power, the nature of threats to peace and stability, and the role of international institutions. This course will examine alternative theories and frameworks for understanding post cold war developments, and test these theories against emergent reality. How, for example, do these contending theories explain the origins and consequences of terrorism and other global threats? What importance do they assign to the persistence of poverty and global inequality; to internal ethno/religious conflict and political instability; to 'globalization and its discontents'? How do these theories assess the potential and implications of renewed great power conflict? How do they address the problem of U.S. hegemony and the reaction of others (states and non-states) to this new reality?
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUGHIST1-UC 5820Consult CatalogThe American ExperienceExamines the social, cultural, political, ecological, and economic forces that created the American nation and shaped its development from European colonization to the end of the Cold War. Major themes and issues discussed include Puritanism, slavery and race, the American Revolution, feminism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, immigration and industrialization, the Great Depression and reform, the World Wars, the Cold War, counterculture and the 1960s, and the rise of neoconservatism.
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUGMEST1-UC 6007Fall 2017Gender, Sexualities & The MediaThis course examines the relationships among media, sexuality, and gender politics. Students analyze theories of the construction of sexuality, femininity, masculinity, and male violence from multidisciplinary perspectives - biological, cultural, psychological, and anthropological. Applying feminist theories, queer theories, film theories, and theories of sexual scripts to the text of popular media and sexually explicit materials (such as pornography), students engage in a discussion of eroticism, sexual fantasy, desire, and the eroticization of violence. Students learn to demonstrate a critical understanding of the key theories of gender and sexuality from multiple disciplines, and to apply these theories in their analyses of the media text
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIESUGMEST1-UC 6047Fall 2017Media & CommunityAn analysis of the roles of culture, technology, and communication in defining, sustaining, and transforming community. We begin with a series of theoretical discussions on the relationship between communication and community, media ecology and human ecology, media technology, transportation, and human communication patterns in the urban and suburban environments, as well as place-bound community and virtual community. We will offer case studies of communities that have been created, sustained, and shaped by traditional mass media and new media technologies such as mobile communication, the Internet, and social networking. We will also consider the social, economic, political, and legal/regulatory dimensions of these communities. This course aims to foster students' ability to articulate, discuss, and analyze theories in community studies as well as issues relating to the social, economic, political, cultural, ethical, and legal/regulatory ramifications of communication media's impact on communities of various kinds
SHANGHAIUGCCCF-SHU 101W10Fall 2017Perspectives on the Humanities: Expatriate, Immigrant, RefugeeExpatriate, immigrant, or refugee: how and by whom are such labels determined? As modern borders blur and concepts of œworld citizenship  emerge, how do the circumstances of one ™s emigration continue to be the determining factor of one ™s social status and cultural cache upon arrival to a new country? In what ways does the adoption or imposition of such labels affect the personal, communal, and economic lives of the traveller? How do historical relationships between nations determine the way its citizens are viewed when travelling abroad? When and how does œtravel  become œflight  or œexile?  How is criminality portrayed and punished according to emigrant status? How do communities of emigrants (expatriate communities, immigrant communities, and refugee communities) interact with each other in-flight, upon arrival, and once settled in their shared adopted homeland? Where do these communities intersect and diverge, and how are moments of intersection and divergence internally processed and externally performed? In this course, students will explore the questions above through close engagement with a plethora of critical and creative texts. Students will interpret the representation of expatriates, immigrants, and refugees in literature, film, and mass media through a critical lens, drawing from post-colonialist thought, literary theory, and historical documentation. This course will extend writing skills and concepts learned in Writing as Inquiry, focusing on critical theory, research, academic writing and expression in the Humanities. The primary assignments will be analytical essays and a digital expressions project
SHANGHAIUGCCCF-SHU 101W14Fall 2017Perspectives on the Humanities: Diasporas, Minorities, and Human RightsTransnational mobility, whether in the form of voluntary transition or enforced movement, has come to define our contemporary world as well as reshape West-East and North-South divides. This course will examine a series of phenomena we associate with migration and mobility, including diaspora, human rights, and culture clashes. The writing-intensive course will provide guidelines for understanding contemporary geopolitical landscapes shaped by migrants and minorities through an examination of their cultural productions written in various genres. Close textual and visual readings will be accompanied by discussions of current debates on citizenship, integration, nationalism and multiculturalism as articulated in Europe, Asia and the Americas. Analytic insights will be derived from cultural studies, postcolonial studies, studies of migration, race, and gender, and critical ethnic studies. The course will examine case studies of exiled Jews in the diaspora (Hannah Arendt, Stefan Zweig), intellectuals and activists who have discussed race, displacement and civil rights movements (W. E. B. Du Bois, Jane Nardal, Angela Davis, Yuri Kochiyama), guestworker and migrant literature from Europe, contemporary literature of displacement (Yiyun Lu), and cultural theorists (Arjun Appadurai, Homi Bhabha, Avtar Brah, Rey Chow, Robin D. Kelley)
SHANGHAIUGCCCF-SHU 101W16Fall 2017Perspectives on the Humanities: Brutes, Monsters, Ghosts, and Other Troubling CreaturesThis course will focus on representations of otherness: how do animals, objects, monsters, ghosts, and other phantasmagoric, hybrid creatures reflect and subvert existing power structures? We will examine how these œtroubling creatures  speak to societal anxieties about gender, sexuality, class, race, and culture. We will also explore how these creatures, by speaking unexpectedly and out-of-turn, challenge power hierarchies. Course materials include fiction, comic books, film, and theoretical texts and will introduce students to literary analysis, film studies, gender studies, and philosophical debates about the division between the human and the nonhuman
SHANGHAIUGCCCF-SHU 101W3Fall 2017Perspectives on the Humanities: Tales of Gender and PowerThis course will explore how human relationships are impacted by the expression, exercise and experience of power as it interacts with gender. We will start in the realm of the sacred by examining various cosmogonies ™ gender dynamics ”the Sumerian, Greek, Chinese and Judeo-Christian. This will lead us to special consideration of the primary relational constellations among humans, i.e. families shaped by father-mother-son-daughter allegiances, and couples by lover-spouse intimacies. Gender figures prominently in the dynamics of these relationships, significantly impacting individuals, families, social groups and cultural traditions. While our main objective is to gain a deeper understanding of the subtle yet complex plays of power involved in gender relations, our examination of texts will also bring us close to other fundamental human issues, such as: the quest for knowledge, the uncertainties of identity and self, the creative need for love and community, the compulsive fear of/attraction to death, and the longing for transformation and transcendence, amongst others. The course will draw on a range of literary texts (epic, novel, film, drama, etc.), products of visual culture, and forms of the expressive/performance arts to explore how each articulates and resolves (or not) the complexities inherent in the above relationships. To gain perspective, we will apply a variety of critical lenses to our close readings of texts, including psychological and philosophical theorists such as Freud, Luce Irigaray, and Judith Butler. This course will extend writing skills and concepts learned in Writing as Inquiry, focusing on critical theory, research, and academic writing and expression in the humanities. The primary assignments will be analytical essays and a digital expressions project
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2002Fall 2017Social Work Practice IIIThe overall objective of this course is to help students deepen and extend their assessment and intervention skills in work with individuals and families who show a range of problems (e.g., mental illness, substance abuse, AIDS, physical illness and disability, domestic violence, rape, and sexual abuse). The impact of diversity and oppression is discussed throughout the course. Students are taught to recognize and resolve ethical and value conflicts, to recognize gaps in service and dysfunctional agency or social policies, to consider strategies for developing resources, and to integrate research thinking and findings into their practice. Formerly titled Clinical Practice with Individuals & Families
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2011Consult CatalogAdvanced Social Policy- Mental HealthThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society. Two major options are provided: (a) students may elect to take SWPP II focusing on a generic perspective and representing a broad array of policies affecting populations at risk (S44.2010), or (b) students may elect to take a SWPP II class that focuses on social welfare policies from a specific field of practice/specific population group, including health, mental health, criminal justice, family violence, or children and families (S44.2011-2015)
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2013Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy- Criminal JusticeThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policieThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society. Two major options are provided: (a) students may elect to take SWPP II focusing on a generic perspective and representing a broad array of policies affecting populations at risk (S44.2010), or (b) students may elect to take a SWPP II class that focuses on social welfare policies from a specific field of practice/specific population group, including health, mental health, criminal justice, family violence, or children and families (S44.2011-2015
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2016Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy- Substance AbuseThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society. Two major options are provided: (a) students may elect to take SWPP II focusing on a generic perspective and representing a broad array of policies affecting populations at risk (S44.2010), or (b) students may elect to take a SWPP II class that focuses on social welfare policies from a specific field of practice/specific population group, including health, mental health, criminal justice, family violence, or children and families
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2017Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy GerontologyThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society. Two major options are provided: (a) students may elect to take SWPP II focusing on a generic perspective and representing a broad array of policies affecting populations at risk (S44.2010), or (b) students may elect to take a SWPP II class that focuses on social welfare policies from a specific field of practice/specific population group, including health, mental health, criminal justice, family violence, or children and families
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2019Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy: Immigration and RefugeesThe course explores policy dynamics, patterns, and changes through a closer look at history, theories, frameworks, ethical issues, forces of oppression and the paths to social, economic, and political justice relevant to a special population. We will discuss current issues and policies related to immigrants and refugees in global comparative perspective, with necessary historical overview and with focus on the U.S. immigration. Specifically, we will discuss issues and relevant policies of changing migration flows, expanding ethnic and economic diversity of immigrants, immigrant women, unauthorized immigrants, transnationalism and development, new approaches to assimilation, and second generation/children of immigrants
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2020Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy- Intl Mental HealthThis course will introduce students to the overarching framework of international social policy and development with comparative references to developing and developed regions of the world. Emphasis will be on the identification of social, economic and political issues that impact those most vulnerable and disadvantaged by poverty, gender, age, disability, religion or ethnicity; and will explore the development and implementation of public and private global responses. Social policies, interventions, and solutions will be analyzed highlighting critical areas of poverty, human rights of children, gender issues including violence against women and trafficking, health including mental health, HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases, migration, and complex emergencies including conflicts, climate change and natural disasters.
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2021Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy- LgbtqThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2022Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy-Primary & Behavioral Health Care IntegrationThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society.
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2024Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy-DisabilityThis advanced concentration course examines urban social problems from the perspective of their impact on individuals, families and communities, focusing on at-risk populations in the context of an urban environment. The course builds on the policy content offered in the Professional Foundation Year and links policy to practice and research skills that have been developed. Emphasis is placed on the link between social and economic justice and issues relating to diversity. The first part of the course is an examination of the policy making cycle, inclusive of social problem definition, policy formulation, implementation and critical analysis of policy. A detailed section on evaluation of policies as they affect societal structures, communities, agencies, clients and practitioners is then discussed. Finally, a major section of the course presents theories related to organizational change and strategies for practitioners to influence policies and promote change at the client level, the agency level, the community level and the broader society
SILVERGRADMSWAC-GS 2025Fall 2017Advanced Social Policy: Gender and International Social Policy DevelopmentThis course will address the complex and emerging global issues in gender perspectives within the overarching framework of international development policy and human rights. The focus will be on understanding historical and current efforts to promote social justice for women and girls in many areas of the world where social and cultural roles are rapidly changing and poverty, economic disparity, migration and gender-based violence are increasing. With comparative references to developing and developed regions of the world, we will explore the social, political, economic and environmental factors that impact women ™s status including their mental health and well-being. Course topics include emerging gender issues such as understanding the international human rights framework, reproductive rights, physical and mental health, media and representations of women, men in partnership, and the impact of complex emergencies including conflicts, climate change and natural disasters. We will explore current efforts to define a comprehensive gender approach from the health, development and social sectors, and the need to develop effective global campaigns and advocacy strategies to ensure that women ™s interests and rights are strongly represented in the future global Post-2015 Development Agenda
SILVERGRADPHDSW-GS 3059Fall 2017Seminar on Social Policy History and AnalysisThis course is required for all PhD students. It is designed to expose students to some of the major cross-cutting themes in the United States social policy today (e.g., poverty and inequality, universalism and selectivity) and to a selected group from among those currently on the public agenda (e.g., the working poor, immigrants). The overarching goals of this course are that students learn about the major social policies and programs that affect people's well-being or quality of life and various aspects of social service delivery; understand the ways in which direct social work practice enacts social policies and is shaped by them; and develop expertise in understanding social policy content, policy actions of agencies, professional associations, and political bodies, and the skills needed to influence social policy. This course emphasizes the roles that social issues, values, power, politics, the economy, discrimination, and advocacy play in the dynamic policy making and implementation environment. This course thus provides students with the policy related competencies and practice skills for conducting research-informed policy analysis and advocating for policy change. In particular, through lecture and discussion this course will explicitly use issues relating to poverty, inequality, and opportunity with special, but not exclusive, emphasis on these phenomena in American society as an example to illustrate social policy analysis. The course will examine theoretical principles of social policy, US social policy history, poverty and inequality, the causes of poverty and inequality, major social program through policy analysis perspectives, and public policies designed to reduce poverty and inequality and promote opportunity. The course assumes some prior background in social policy. Students without this background will be expected to do some supplementary reading. The course reading list provides ample opportunity for students to "fill in" their basic social policy knowledge and enrich their background in areas of special interest
SILVERGRADMSWEL-GS 2000Fall 2017Introduction to Social Work Practice in the U.S.The purpose of this course is to prepare international students for coursework and Field Instruction in the MSW Program. Lectures and experiential exercises will help students develop an understanding of 1) the background of social work in the U.S., 2) the core values of social work in the U.S., 3) core knowledge and the biopsychosocial framework, and 4) the U.S. cultural context of social work practice. This course also prepares students for Diversity, Racism, Oppression, and Privilege and the integrated Social Work Practice/Field Instruction courses beginning in January. The course will first examine the history of social work practice in the context of the present, explore implications of different theoretical and practice models with particular attention to person-in-environment, and the critical aspects of the helping relationship which is primary to promoting growth and change. Particular focus will be on social work values, ethics, cultural competence, and an understanding between client, agency and policy practice
SILVERGRADMSWEL-GS 2086Fall 2017Clinical Practice With FamiliesThis course will offer students an introduction to social work practice with children and their families and will acquaint students with the diversity of family composition, family rules and family roles in the 2000's. Students will learn about conventional nuclear family composition, the single-parent home, foster and adoptive homes, homes where children and parents are cross-racial dyads and triads, and homes where lesbian or gay partners are engaged in rearing a natural-born and/or an adopted child. Engaging such families from diverse racial, ethnic, economic, religious and cultural backgrounds will be a major focus in this course, in order to promote students? Current Issues in Contemporary Family Life
SILVERGRADMSWEL-GS 2095Fall 2017Contem Gay,Lesb,Bisexual and Transgender IssuesThis course aims to prepare students for effective practice with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) people by providing a deeper understanding of GLBT identities, families, health and mental health challenges, and issues of political advocacy. The course will examine a variety of issues that affect GLBT people in contemporary life, and will act as a springboard for students to engage in additional learning in a chosen area of interest. The course will use lectures, guest presentations by local and national experts, classroom discussions, student presentations, assigned readings, and written assignments in order to achieve its objectives
SILVERGRADMSWEL-GS 2136Fall 2017Inequalities in GlobalizationHow are globalization processes affecting the lives of people in the world? The course examines the movement of people, commodities, and capital and the ways in which these processes are changing economies and cultures. The course will cover aspects of transnationalism and migration, production, distribution and consumption practices in global perspective, the formation of new identities and the construction of minorities, gender dynamics and the pursuit of human rights. We will adopt a multidisciplinary perspective to examine the relations between economy, society and culture. The focus will be on understanding the generation of inequalities (poverty, wealth, luxury, and marginalization) in globalization
SILVERGRADMSWPF-GS 2006Fall 2017Human Behavior in The Social Environment IThis course is centered in the biopsychosocial perspective that stresses a multidimensional view of human development and behavior. The focus is on the transactional relationship between human behavior and pertinent psychological, social, biological, economic, cultural, environmental, and institutional forces. Multiple theoretical perspectives are used to understand the behavior of individuals, families, groups, social networks, and systems. The role of social stressors such as poverty and oppression and their impact on human development are evaluated. All aspects of development and behavior are studied in the context of diversity. The life cycle stages of infancy and childhood are also viewed from a biopsychosocial perspective
SILVERGRADMSWPF-GS 2010Fall 2017Diversity, Racism, Oppression and PrivilegeThis course centers on expanding the student's understanding of the meaning of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and culture, as well as the concepts of prejudice, discrimination, oppression, stigma, and stereotyping. Racism, particularly as it impacts on personal, professional, institutional, and societal levels, is studied. Special attention is given to the experiences of African Americans and Latinos in U.S. society in general and in the New York City metropolitan area in particular. Within an integrative perspective, implications for direct and indirect social work practice are explored. Specifically, the importance of ethnoculturally competent practice for the individual worker and the design of service delivery systems are covered
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 21Fall 2017Human Behavior in The Social Environment IThis course centers on the biopsychosocial perspective that stresses a multidimensional view of human development and behavior. The focus is on the transactional relationship between human behavior and pertinent psychological, social, biological, economic, cultural, environmental, and institutional forces. Multiple theoretical perspectives are used to understand the behavior of individuals, families, groups, social networks, and systems. The role of social stressors such as poverty and oppression and their impact on human development are evaluated. All aspects of development and behavior are studied in the context of diversity. The life cycle stages of infancy and childhood are also viewed from a biopsychosocial perspective
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 31Fall 2017Social Work Practice IThe overall objective of this course is to provide students with an integrative framework that combines direct practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities with a commitment to organizational and social change. Students are helped to develop skills in a broad range of practitioner roles. The course examines the history, values, and ethics of the profession; the societal and organizational context of practice; and the impact of diversity and oppression. Skills in systems assessment, engagement, interviewing, collaboration and advocacy, relationship issues and self-awareness, and the practice principles of both crisis and extended intervention are taught. A social work laboratory component provides students with opportunities for experiential learning
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 55Fall 2017Diversity, Racism, Oppression and Privilege The course centers on expanding the student's understanding of the meaning of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and culture, as well as the concepts of prejudice, discrimination, oppression, stigma, and stereotyping. Racism, particularly as it impacts on personal, professional, institutional, and societal levels, is studied. Special attention is given to the experiences of African Americans and Latino/as in U.S. society in general and in the New York City metropolitan area in particular. Within an integrative perspective, implications for direct and indirect social work practice are explored. Specifically, the importance of ethnoculturally competent practice for the individual worker and the design of service delivery systems are covered
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 68Fall 2017Service Learning Through Community EngagementThis course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity on the Lower East Side. Students will provide tutoring for K-12 youth and/or adult learners from disadvantaged backgrounds at the University Settlement House. The accompanying course will offer broad and general content related to students' service experiences. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experience
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 72Fall 2017Service Learning with Immigrant YouthThis weekly one-hour course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity with refugees. Emphasis will be placed on students. understanding of the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. Students will learn about immigration and resettling refugees. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experience. As part of their community service they will provide academic coaching and mentoring for refugees from such nations as Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Burma, Moldova, Uganda, and Sudan for a minimum of two hours weekly at Brooklyn International High School (Tuesdays or Wednesdays from 2:30pm to 4:30pm)
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 81Fall 2017Whose Social Justice is it Anyway?: Spirituality, Religion & Civic Engagement This theoretical and experiential course will examine the concept of social justice dating back to Roman Catholic teachings by St. Thomas Aquinas regarding poverty; leading up to modern day umbrella movements which include race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, national origin, first language and the ways in which ideas about social justice have shifted. This will include intersections with global human rights movements, evangelicalism and intersectionality regarding identity politics. The course will also explore the ways in which religious ideology has fostered civic engagement interrogating the work of Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Theresa, Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, Dalai Lama, Imam Khalid Latif, Desmond Tutu, Parker Palmer, and bell hooks. Students will participate in ethnographic community-based projects learning about how religion and/or spirituality are utilized for civic engagement
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 101Fall 2017Intergroup Dialogue: RaceInterested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/IGDSpring2017 before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program
SILVERUGUNDSW-US 102Fall 2017Intergroup Dialogue: Sexual OrientationInterested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/IGDSpring2017before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program
STEINHARDTGRADCSCD-GE 2141Consult CatalogMulti-Cultural in Communicative Sciences & DisordersIntroduces students to diverse populations in our society & to explore how differences among both individuals & cultures in terms of gender, age, race, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, religion, language, dialect or country of origin, can affect interpersonal & group communication, as well as clinical practice. Topics devoted to improving cultural competence considerations for understanding, evaluating & remediation of communication & swallowing disorders in culturally & linguistically diverse (CLD) populations. Designed to improve effectiveness as a clinician with diverse clients & to help prepare for today’s workplace setting that often includes individuals from different backgrounds.
STEINHARDTGRADINTE-GE 2545Consult CatalogImmigration and Education in the WorldContemporary (im)migration is a global phenomenon that shapes populations and nations of inequality. Each semester will focus on a different national context of schooling and education. This course serves as an introduction to different theoretical and empirical scholarship on the role of education in the social adaptation on (im)migrants, and how race/ethnicity, social class,and gender matter
STEINHARDTGRADSOED-GE 2002Consult CatalogIntro to Sociology of EdBasic behavioral science principles applied to the study of education as a social institution. An examination of social pressures and conflicts that underlie controversies in the field of education. Inequality, innovation, organizational control are some areas to be studied.
STEINHARDTGRADARTED-GE 2015Fall 2017Contemporary Art & Critical Pedagogy:This course addresses philosophical. historical, socio-politcal contexts of multiculturalism in the United States, with an emphasis on relationship to critical pedagogy and contemporary art practices. Current ideas about representation and identity will be considered specifically in relation to a critique of mainstream notions of multiculturalism and art. Topics may include the history of race in the United States, the role of ethnicity and class in shaping identity, and feminism and multiculturalism. The course of addresses pedagogy and curriculum in a variety of educational settings, including schools, museums, and alternative spaces
STEINHARDTGRADARTED-GE 2070Fall 2017Current Issues in Art EducationClose critical examination of art education and its relationship to social, cultural, economic, and political processes based on an introduction to critical theory. Understanding the transformations in contemporary art and its challenges to notions of originality, creativity, and aesthetic formalism in order to envision ways of rethinking art education curricula and pedagogy in schools, museums, and other institutional art program
STEINHARDTGRADARTED-GE 2081Fall 2017Special Education, Disabilities Studies and Contemporary Art This course examines the history of Special Education in the American public education system, as well as what it means to be a ˜disabled ™ student today by examining the vital components that teachers must be aware of when working with students with disabilities. There are 14 generally recognized disability classifications today, each with its ™ own unique impact on the educational life of the affected student. This course will look at the current research into multiple intelligences & learning styles, where it becomes evident that using the arts; music, visual arts & dance, can allow access points to many students into the world of learning. Students will explore how collaboration with general education teachers can help inform their pedagogical practice as well as deepen the educational experience of their students. Additionally, the course covers the Individual Education Plan and how to use it as a teaching tool. Students will learn how to partner with the family, community, colleagues & pupils to create a differentiated & welcoming classroom environment. Finally, the course will also examine the ways disability is represented visually in our culture, both through media/popular culture & contemporary art practices.
STEINHARDTGRADEDLED-GE 2080Fall 2017School Design: Issues and ChallengesDeals with research & practice regarding leadership of school units, with emphasis on the knowledge & planning required of school leaders focused on the provision of high quality instruction. Emphasis is on the study & design of classroom & school processes that promote equity in educational opportunities across the school community, including design of learning environments, accountability systems, & assessment strategies. The legal & fiscal environments in which school function are introduced.
STEINHARDTGRADEDPLY-GE 2030Fall 2017Education and Social PolicyCourse is designed to introduce students to public policy & provide a foundation for understanding & assessing education policies in particular. Students will examine the theoretical perspectives in policy as well as examine the policy process & the institutions under which policies are formed, specifically the difference between market systems & the role of government. Fourth, the methods & tools for policy analysis, both before & after policies are implemented will be studied. Finally, students will examine the role of institutions as well as policy design. Topics may include No Child Left Behind, financial aid for higher education, tax reforms to encourage saving for college, school reform in major cities, poverty & inequality, among others
STEINHARDTGRADHPSE-GE 2161Fall 2017Diversity in Higher EducationExamines current issues & research relating to participation & success of students & faculty from different backgrounds in U.S. higher education. Emphasis is on the interplay between ethnicity & institutional, societal, governmental, & personal influences on participation & retention of students & faculty. Considers the extent to which efforts by institutions & governments have been successful in encouraging access & retention in various levels & types of institutions.
STEINHARDTGRADINTE-GE 2023Fall 2017Socio-anthropological Approaches to International EducationCourse examines the sociological & anthropological interrelationship among society, culture, & education in various national & local settings. Focusing on pluralistic communities ”namely, the tension between universalism, relativism, & multiculturalism, and issues of ˜race, ™ gender/sexual orientation, ethnicity/linguistic group affiliations ”the course will explore how culture & social relations influence behavior, personality, norms, & values, as well as how these shape relationships between individuals, groups & institutions within & across societie
STEINHARDTGRADAPSY-GE 2014Fall 2017Psychology of Women: A Social- Psychological ApproachSurveys psychology of women. Topics include psychoanalytic conceptions of women; theories of sex-role development; sexuality & psychological health; mothering, fathering, & gender arrangements; ways of knowing; abuse , dominance, violence, & power, & achievement.
STEINHARDTGRADAPSY-GE 2105Fall 2017Culture, Context, and Psychology In depth examination of cultural & contextual factors & how these factors impact every aspect of psychological theory, practice & research. Major theories, assessment approaches, clinical practice & research in psychology will be critiques by investigating universalistic principles, behavior & experience as it occurs in cultures & contexts & is influenced by culture & context, as well as issues such as oppression, racism, prejudice, social class & value differences.
STEINHARDTGRADAPSY-GE 2527Fall 2017The Development of Immigrant Origin YouthThis course is designed to introduce students to research on the adaptation of immigrant origin youth. The course will concentrate on psychological, anthropological, sociological, & educational contributions to the study of immigrant children & adolescents. We will review the growing presence of immigrant youth in public schools in the United States & other post-industrial societies. We will consider a variety of stressors involved in the process of immigration along with the concomitant repercussions on the martial dyad, family relationships, & on the children themselves. We will explore the relevant literature on community forces, marginality, & minority status. We will consider the new research efforts to describe the various pathways immigrant children take in (trans)forming their developing identities. Lastly, we will examine the critical role of the educational experience on the adaptation of immigrant youth.
STEINHARDTGRADAPSY-GE 2895Fall 2017Counseling Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth An overview of what it means to be a gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender youth. Examines youths ™ experiences with stigma, prejudice, harassment & violence based on sexual orientation & gender role expression. Explores ways mental health professionals can counsel youth to reduce their psychosocial stress related to coming out & discrimination, & to enhance pscyhosocial well-being in forming sexual & gender identitie
STEINHARDTGRADBILED-GE 2001Fall 2017Bilingual Multicultural Education: Practice & TheoryTheory, policy, and practice of bilingual education. Key topics include models and programs of bilingual education: policy and politics of language minority education in the U.S. and international contexts; psycholinguist perspectives on bilingualism, including language development; cultural, social, and political perspectives on language minority education; and evaluation of bilingual education programs. Emphasis on pedagogical implications of the above, with particular attention to native language development, second language/literacy teaching for developmentally and linguistically diverse students
STEINHARDTGRADMCC-GE 2182Fall 2017Communication Processes: Gender,Race/Cultural Id Course examines past and current studies on language, communication theories, speech perception, and other aspects of verbal and nonverbal behavior. Students relate these studies to how gender, race, culture and sexual orientation are developed and reflected in society in both personal and professional relationships
STEINHARDTUGAPSY-UE 1032Consult CatalogPsychology & Social ChangeOverview of psychological theoretical frameworks, concepts, strategies & tactics of intervention & social change at different levels of analysis. Emphasis is placed on designing & implementing social change interventions in the domains of environmental behavior, poverty, inequality, health, education, conflict & peace, collective action & social movements.
STEINHARDTUGCHDED-UE 1142Fall 2017Integrated Curr/Multi Ed Soc Studies/Curr DesignThis course will provide an introduction to the foundations of multicultural, culturally relevant education, with particular attention to its implications in the area of social studies. We will examine issues of historical and current inequity in our schools and society. Explores dimensions of identity and diversity, as well as concepts of prejudice, discrimination and racism. Introduces the theory and skills necessary for successful culturally responsive teaching. Establishes the basis for planning integrative, social studies curricula that are inclusive of all voices and perspectives, and which prepare students to be agents of change in their own lives and education. Models broad variety of instructional strategies aimed at eliciting participation of diverse learners. This course proposed that multicultural education is by definition and necessity teaching for social justice
STEINHARDTUGHSED-UE 1046Fall 2017US Campus Politics and Student Protest in the 21st CenturyThis course explores why student protest has surged repeatedly on 21st century campuses and how American universities became lightning rods for criticism from both the Left and the Right. Topics include student movements against racial and gender discrimination, nativism student debt, exploitation of labor, the concentration of wealth, Euro-centric curriculum, and the rise graduate student labor unionization. Student struggles over academic freedom, corporatization, and academia ™s globalization, the commercialization of intercollegiate athletics, academic boycotts, divestment, and campus governance will also be assessed. These campus conflicts will be set into historical perspective, probing their roots in earlier struggles over the nature, mission, uses, and failures of the 21st century university, illuminating the changes, continuities, progress, and setbacks in American higher education and its student movements. Right wing student activists and their off campus allies will also be studied, as will the fate of free speech on campus in the politically polarized world of 21st Century America
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1025Fall 2017Race and MediaAmerica's founding principles of equality and equal opportunity have long been the subject of interpretation, debate, national angst, and widespread (oftentimes violent) conflict. No more is this the case than when we talk about the issue of race. While biological notions of race have lost their scientific validity, race remains a salient issue in American life as a social and political reality sustained through a wide variety of media forms. The broad purpose of this course is to better understand how notions of race have been defined and shaped in and through these mediated forms. Specific attention may be given o the ways that race is articulated in forms of mass media and popular culture.
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1700Fall 2017Gender and CommunicationThis course explores the ways people create, maintain, and augment the meaning of gender, developing insight into understanding gender ideology and the media representation of gender. The course examines how ideas about gender shape our communication practices, and how our practices of communication produce gender.
STEINHARDTUGTCHL-UE 41Fall 2017American Dilemmas: Race, Inequality, and the UnfulfilledThis course provides students with background on the historical & sociological foundation of education in the United States. It examines the role that education has played in advancing civil & human rights I it explores the ways in which education continues to be implicated in the maintenance of social inequality in American society. Through readings, lectures, films & class debates, students will gain an understanding of some of the most complex & controversial issues confronting education today including: affirmative action, Bi-Lingual Education, Special Education, the achievement gap, school choice & vouchers, & the role of race & culture in student achievement.
STEINHARDTUGARTCR-UE 1154Fall 2017Art and Ideas: Identity and Post-Identity in Contemporary ArtThis course will examine some of the many ways in which contemporary art has been used to interrogate, problematize, and contest traditional notions of identity. Using approaches drawn from feminist, gender, and queer studies, together with critical art theory, the course explores how recent and current art practices pursue skeptical, situated inquiries into the ways that subjective and collective identities interact with history, geography, ability, class, technologies, and power.
STEINHARDTUGECED-UE 1019Fall 2017Lrng Exp Fam/Sch/CommIntroduction to the development of curriculum for young learners in diverse settings. Topics include: early childhood environments, linguistic and cultural diversity, early language and learning in family, school, and community settings, working collaboratively with families to create learning environments responsive to the needs of all children.
STEINHARDTUGHSED-UE 1033Fall 2017Global Culture WarsThis course will examine the origins, development, and meanings of so-called cultural conflict in the United States. Topics will include abortion, gay rights, bilingualism, and the teaching of evolution in public schools. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Cultures & Contexts
STEINHARDTUGINTE-UE 10Fall 2017Introduction to Global EducationThis survey course offers an introduction to the field of global education. Education in the 21st century is undoubtedly a central area for international collaboration as well as contestation. In this survey course, we will examine key debates about the role of education in national & international society, examining the multiple stake holders that work to improve education globally, & their diverse interpretations of that mandate. The course will introduce students to the history of mass education as a global phenomenon, & the comparative ways in which it is now studied. Students will examine both K-12 & higher education. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences
STEINHARDTUGINTE-UE 1010Fall 2017International Human Rights Activism/EducationHow do educators & activists spread messages about human rights? What might make them more likely to succeed? What are the ethical & political implications of using education as a tool for moral persuasion? Students will engage with these questions, as well as be introduced to the role of the United Nations, NGOs, & state governments in facilitating human rights education. Students will also engage critically with debates over whether the human rights system is an appropriate way to achieve justice in diverse contexts. Throughout the course, students will apply theory on human rights education & activism to real-life examples, as well as create their own advocacy campaign & lesson plan.
STEINHARDTUGINTE-UE 1013Fall 2017Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies CourseHow can we explain the many violent conflicts around the world today? What is the lived experience of people in conflict-affected contexts? What can international and local actors do to build peace? These are just some of the many questions that undergraduate students will tackle in this introduction to peace and conflict studies. Students will become familiar with theoretical perspectives, real-world examples, and analytical skills to better understand, critically evaluate, and respond to contemporary issues related to peace and conflict.
STEINHARDTUGINTE-UE 1545Fall 2017Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the New ImmigrationThe objectives of this course is to introduce students to a sampling of recent theoretical & empirical work, in various academic disciplines, dealing with immigration. We will achieve this objective by systematically examining very recent research in comparative & interdisciplinary perspectives with a particular focus on the emerging Inter American migraine system. Students will learn about the most recent trends in Latin American, Caribbean & to a lesser extent Asian migration to the U. S., & will compare the nature of current immigration scholarship in the United States to developments in other postindustrial settings. An examination of the comparative materials will highlight isomorphic conditions--as well as differences--in immigration debates, policies, processes, & outcomes. This course will be interdisciplinary. We shall examine recent data & theoretical work in a variety of fields such as economics, education, law, policy, psychology, sociocultural anthropology, sociolinguistics, & sociology. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1019Fall 2017Media & IdentityThis course will examine the relationship between mediated forms of communications the formation of identities, both individual and social. Attention will be paid to the way mediated forms of communication represent different social and cultural groupings, with a particular emphasis on gender, race, ethnicity, class and nationality.
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1023Fall 2017East Asian Media and Popular CultureThis course examines contemporary mass media in East Asia by focusing on media institutions and practices in Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China. Special attention is paid to such issues as media regulations and censorship, press freedom and journalistic practices, the rise of East Asian media industries, intra-region flows of information and entertainment, and the presence and influence of transnational media companies in East Asia.
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1141Fall 2017Hollywood Films and American LifeThis course examines the vast & rich myth-making power of Hollywood film narratives that influence dominant cultural views of American identity. Students view films that explore problems & promises of American culture & society such as equality, democracy, justice, class, gender, sexual orientation, & race/ethnicity. Students analyze films while considering the work of historians, sociologists, film critics, media studies scholars, anthropologists & journalists. Students will screen films outside of class. Assignments include creating a short film that explores the city where myths are both lived out & refuted on a daily basis
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1340Fall 2017Religion and MediaThis course examines the ways in which conventional and non-conventional media recreate religious experience. Increasingly, religion is experienced not one in sacred spaces, and through ritual and scripture, but is also communicated through radio, TV, and the Internet, as well as in consumer culture and political campaigns. This course examines the significance of religion in modern life from historical and contemporary perspectives, paying attention to questions of religious and national difference, as well as material and symbolic practices.
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1345Fall 2017Fashion and PowerThis course examines fashion as a form of communication and culture. Through cultural and media studies theory, we will examine how fashion makes meaning, and how it has been valued through history, popular culture and media institutions, focusing on the relationship between fashion, visual self-presentation, and power. The course will situate fashion both n terms of its production and consumption, addressing its role in relation to identity and body politics (gender, race, sexuality, class), art and status, nationhood and the global economy, celebrity and Hollywood culture, youth cultures and subversive practices.
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1401Fall 2017Global Cult/IdentitiesThis course examines globalization as it is inscribed in everyday practices through the transnational traffic of persons, cultural artifacts and ideas. The course will focus on issues of transnational mobility, modernity, the local/global divide and pay specific attention to how categories of race, gender and ethnicity intersect with transnational change.
STEINHARDTUGMCC-UE 1408Fall 2017Queer Identity and Popular CultureIn this course, we will explore queerness as identity, practice, theory, & politics, all through the lens of popular culture. Our approach will be grounded in theories, methods & texts of communication & media studies, thus it will serve as a complement to other queer theory & culture courses offered across the university. Readings will include both theoretical texts & case studies both historical & contemporary. Students will complete the course with a critical understanding of what it means to be & "do" queer in contemporary culture. Students will also be equipped to bring queer analytical tools to their everyday & professional encounters with popular culture
STEINHARDTUGOT-UE 8170Fall 2017Deans Global Honors: Disability in a Global Context: ItalyThis course is a Dean ™s Global Honors Seminar and available by application only. Eligible students are contacted directly. It includes travel to Florence, Italy during January 2018 and requires a $400 fee. This course explores the implications of having a disability in global contexts. Students will explore and identify factors, which can influence a community ™s view of disability, including enablers and barriers to participation in daily life especially for people with disabilities.
STEINHARDTUGSOED-UE 1015Fall 2017Educ as Soc InstitutionPart of the common pedagogical core, this course provides an introduction to the social foundations of education. The structure of education in terms of the rights and responsibilities of teachings, administrators, community members and policy makers in relation to the rest of the society are explored from both legal and sociological credits of view. Comparisons with education and schooling in other countries are made. The study of particular school and professional issues includes diversity, student variability, bilingualism, and special education in terms of their effects on policy, practice, and student and teacher rights.
STEINHARDTUGTCHL-UE 1030Fall 2017ang Acquis and Literacy Educ/Multi & Multi CntxtStudents will explore the first and second language acquisition process and their implications for the development of literacy skills in multicultural settings. Particular focus will be on both remedial and development processes for acquiring advanced reading and writing skills across the curriculum in middle childhood and adolescence. Emphasis is also placed on the varieties of language and literacy acquisition processes and the role of culture, family, and society in learning.
STEINHARDTUGAPSY-UE 1041Fall 2017Women and Mental Health: A Life Cycle PerspectiveFocuses on the psychology of women & their mental health throughout the life cycle. Topics include socialization & gender, feminist theory & therapy, as well as high prevalence of disorders which occur in girls & women.
STEINHARDTUGAPSY-UE 1278Fall 2017Families, Schools, and Child DevelopmentExamination of the complex relationships between family & school systems, with a special focus on low-income urban communities as they relate to child development. Topics explore the roles culture, immigration, & racial/ethnic diversity play in establishing effective partnerships between families & schools.
STEINHARDTUGSOCED-UE 1117Fall 2017Martin Luther King, Jr: Leadership, Oratory and Mass ProtestThis course explores Martin Luther King's emergence, ideas, and impact as a protest leader. Topics will include the relationship between King and Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, the FBI's covert attempts to discredit King, and how the US government ™s interaction with mass protest movements promotes and limits social change. Students will assess King's political strengths and weaknesses and the criticism he faced from rivals and opponents over his tactics, leadership style, vision for America, and critique of US foreign policy.
STERNUGECON-UB 240Consult CatalogGlobal Economic TrendsThis course will give students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with some of the most important trends that will affect the global economy during their lifetimes. Here is a partial list of the trends to be discussed and some of the questions that will be addressed. - Population Growth Is world population going to keep growing? At what rate? What are going to be the consequences of population growth on economic development and, more in general, peoples well--being? - Aging What are going to be the consequences of aging on economic development and, more in general, peoples well--being? How will population aging affect the business landscape? - Migration Whats the impact of immigration on the salary and employment of natives? Are immigrants wages lower than those of natives? Do immigrants wages increase faster than those of natives? How do second-generation immigrants fare? Do immigrants pay their way? - Urbanization What are the drivers of urbanization? What is the nexus between urbanization and economic growth? Can we successfully address the issues of congestion and housing costs that affect city dwellers? - Depletion of natural resources Are there unexploited gains from applying smart solutions to the issue of natural resources depletion? - Economic Inequality What are the roles of globalization and technological progress in shaping economic inequality? What is the nexus between economic inequality and economic growth? What policies are best suited to lower economic inequality?
STERNUGBPEP-UB 44Fall 2017The Political Economy of Latin AmericaThis course presents an overview of the main questions that surround the political context for the economic development of Latin America in the long run. Why did Latin America fail to develop as quickly as the United States in the 19th century and fall so far behind in the 20th? Why is income inequality so severe in the region? Why is there so much inflation and exchange rate instability and so many financial and economic crises? Why has Latin American had so much political instability with regimes shifting between dictatorship and democracy? What are the characteristics, the strengths and weaknesses, of present day Latin American democracies and how does that affect the potential for future economic growth. The course emphasizes the interaction between poltical theory and economics throughout the history of Latin America, from the colonial period to the present. It addresses the important features of these regimes including state weakness, clientilism and corruption.
STERNUGBPEP-UB 9044Consult CatalogPolitics of Latin AmericaLatin America has long been recognized as the world region with the highest levels of economic inequality. Contestation around this state of affairs has been and continues to be central to political dynamics throughout the region. This seminar reviews literature devoted to explaining the unequal distribution of resources and power in Latin America, with particular attention given to structural features of the region’s economies, the configuration of social and political interests and the distributive impact of different combinations of public policies. Perspectives from political economy and political sociology will be deployed in an effort to understand and explain apparent improvements in income and resource distribution during the past several years and consider the precariousness of these advances in the face of the current economic slowdown in the region. Although Latin America provides the geographic focus of the course, we will engage broader currents of thinking about how inequalities arise and persist over time both in that region and elsewhere. The central objective of the seminar is to familiarize students with key aspects of contemporary Latin American political economy and to situate distributive trends both historically and in light of the core development challenges facing the region in the 21st century. The overarching perspective will be regional, but students will be encouraged to delve deeply into the experience of particular countries, analyzing how political and economic factors have converged to shape the contours of inequality in distinctive settings. Assigned readings analyze a wide range of countries and draw from several disciplines, including political science, economics, sociology, history, anthropology and geography.
STERNUGBSPA-UB 42Consult CatalogEconomics Inequalities: Perspectives and PracticesThis course provides students with a deeper understanding of current policy debates about economic inequality. The course format integrates a discussion seminar with a collaborative research project. In the seminar context, students become familiar with relevant terms and concepts drawn from economics, political science, organizational studies and philosophy. Informed by these analytic perspectives, students undertake research projects focused on the roles that individual organizations play in increasing and/or decreasing economic inequality. Funded by the Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC), these projects include collaboration with business students from ESADE in Barcelona, Spain, SDA Bocconi School of Management in Milan, Italy and Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea. This dimension of the course exposes students to a variety of international perspectives on economic inequality, and allows them to learn from the experience of producing deliverables in a geographically-dispersed team.
TEL AVIVUGHIST-UA 9553Fall 2017Topcs in Mideast History: Palestinian-Israeli ConflictThis course will take the students through the history and the various realities and challenges of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course aims to introduce the fundamental historical trajectories of the conflict, and to present and analyze the conflicting narratives and perceptions of both Palestinians and Israelis over key moments and issues in its history. By so doing, we will pay specific attention to the respective histories of the conflict, as well as to the challenges that each side is encountering over the future of the conflict and possible solutions to it. Among other issues, the course focuses on key moments in the history of Palestine during the British mandate; the conflicting narratives over the 1948 war; Israel and the Palestinians between 1948-1967; the 1967 war and its implications on Israel and the Palestinians; the development of the Palestinian national movement; the first and second Intifadas and the challenges to the Oslo peace process. The course will address these issues through a variety of readings, primary sources and films. As a conclusion, the students will present their own reflections and analyses of various aspects of the history of the conflict and debate its future implications
TEL AVIVUGAPSY-UE 9682Fall 2017Multicultural Counseling and Mental HealthAn examination of the ways in which culture and context shape counselor and client identities and their cross-cultural encounters. Topics include individual identities and systems of societal privilege and oppression associated with gender and sexuality, race/ethnicity, disabilities, class, religion, and other forms of cultural influences. The course also focuses on effective strategies for navigating cross-cultural relationships in helping professions.
TISCHGRADCINE-GT 1127Fall 2017Topics in TV Mad MenFall 2017 Mad Men: Gender, Race, & Culture This course analyzes and contextualizes the complex, ambitious television series Mad Men (2007-2015), looking at Mad Men as both a televisual text and a window onto the past. We will talk about the series and its place within television's "new golden age," analyzing its narrative form and visual style. In addition to looking closely at the series itself, we will read and view historical materials from the era that Mad Men fictionalized, interrogating its representation of the 1960s. The course pays particular attention to how the series engages with historical and contemporary issues around gender and race, to better understand what Mad Men teaches us about the 1960s -- and how, in looking back, it helps us to better understand the present-day. In-class time will include screenings, lecture, and discussion. Out-of-class assignments include readings, additional screenings, and frequent writing
TISCHGRADASPP-GT 2001Fall 2017Issues in Arts PoliticsThis course expands the methodological, theoretical, and discursive possibilities of situating culture and the arts in relation to the political, tracking this relationship in a transnational world. By privileging analytics from transnational feminism, critical race theory, disability discourse, and queer studies, this course specifically reimagines the issues of arts and politics in relation to questions of power and survival. However, rather than perpetuating a dominant discourse of art merely being resistant to the state, we aim to expand other narratives and analytics that seek to complicate not only the political, but also the aesthetic. This course will first establish working definitions of aesthetic theory and practice and political discourse. While tracking shifts in visual art in relation to performance, social practice, and the intermedial, we will also find grounding in concepts from political economy like neoliberalism, biopolitics, and Marxism. By doing so, we will establish methodological approaches to how we analyze legal texts, policy documents, art objects, and moving bodies. From this theoretical and practical grounding in arts and politics, we then engage different legal, œmaterial  sites “ including but not limited to native sovereignty, immigration, citizenship/personhood, œWar on Terror,  intellectual property, and labor. We will ask what analyses of culture and art reveal about such sites. In offering multiple texts, the goal is for us to track intellectual conversations that are occurring across disciplines and fields. In situating art in relation to theory and legal cases, we will examine and destabilize the disciplinary boundaries around what we take/privilege to be fact, truth, ephemera, and merely interesting. By looking at legal cases and theory, critical theory, and cultural production, our meetings will study what it means to critique the law from a œleft/progressive  standpoint(s), seeking to challenge the liberal frames that inform many of our normative claims. What are the limits of both politics and art in describing and addressing bodily injury, pain, and power? The artworks we will draw from come from the Global South, along with Europe and the US. Theorists include Hortense Spillers, Sylvia Wynter, Saba Mahmood, Sue Schweik, Mel Chen, Saidiya Hartman, Michel Foucault, Shannon Jackson, Giorgia Agamben, Jasbir Puar, Dean Spade, Hannah Arendt, and Mark Rifkin, amongst others
TISCHGRADASPP-GT 2006Fall 2017Special Topics: On the Concept of Law—Race and the Reorder of ThingsOn the Concept of Law: Race and the Reorder of Things This course examines what it means to orient theoretical and artistic work towards the œpolitical  and to critique the idea of the law, father, or order. To do so, we will first analyze different approaches to the notion of law. We will query the broader political possibilities and limits of humanistic and aesthetic interventions into the law. What are the material thresholds of not only the law, but also theory and culture? How do liberal notions like personhood and freedom, embedded in individual laws, begin to unravel through a reordering of the concept of the law? Second, we will consider the broader implications of these interventions, particularly as they relate to questions around minoritarian life and existence. How do race, sexuality, religion, gender, class, and disability help us reorder the law, rather than simply discard it? How might such relations of reordering, as proposed by Roderick Ferguson, direct us to more nuanced understandings of political and artistic movements? We will focus on a variety of approaches, ranging from psychoanalysis, transnational feminism, affect, postcolonialism, deconstructionism, Marxism, critical race theory, and queer theory. Authors include but are not limited to Hortense Spillers, Lisa Lowe, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Chantal Mouffe, Walter Benjamin, Glen Sean Coulthard, Roderick Ferguson, Moustafa Bayoumi, Kandice Chuh, Saba Mahmood, Jacques Derrida, Elizabeth Povinelli, Colin Dayan, John Rawls, Audra Simpson, Shoshana Felman, Sylvia Wynter, Samera Esmeir, and Saidiya Hartman. Artists include but are not limited to Jacolby Satterwhite, Candice Lin, Bertolt Brecht, Tania Bruguera, Rick Lowe, Tanya Tagaq, Shirin Neshat, and Ralph Lemon
TISCHGRADASPP-GT 2007Fall 2017Art, Artists, and Social Change4 points “ will count toward general education requirements (Humanities) Social, political, and economic upheavals produce shattering transformations in human life, yet some of the most significant artistic works in literature, visual arts, theatre, film, and music have been created under these extreme circumstances. The focus of this course is on developing an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of the arts, artists, and the artists ™ response as a catalyst for social and political change. We will explore the history of various practical crises and examine how they have influenced art and artists. Some of the examples include the works of Czechoslovakian films during Soviet Occupation, Protest Theatre during Apartheid South Africa, Shostakovich ™s Trio during Soviet Era, underground music scene in present day Iran, Cindy Sherman ™s photography in the USA, Croatian artist Sanjan Ivekovic and Bangali writer Taslima Nasrin ™s. We will also look at some examples of propaganda artists and their work as well, artists like Morteza Avini in Iran and Liu Wenxi of China. By investigating the artist ™s understanding of political, social, and economic forces that impact upon art and their own lives we will examine this question: What are the complex dynamics that are involved in the emergence of movements in the arts
TISCHGRADASPP-GT 2034Fall 2017Female Cultural Rebel in Modern TimesThis class will reflect on feminism, gender and sexuality themes. Some of the topics will be the male and female gaze, the documenting and editing of the female madwoman such as in the documentary œGrey Gardens . We will look at the 1967 documentary of the drag beauty pageant œThe Queen , where we will consider gender fluidity, representation and costuming femininity. Other units will be on gossip, the soap opera, hysteria, horror films, female masculinity, abjection, objectification, anger, ambiguity and invisibility. Students will also be able to concentrate on a particular subject for research. A midterm presentation and final project with companion papers is required
TISCHGRADASPP-GT 2060Fall 2017Cultural Equity The Community ArtsimperativeThis course provides the opportunity for students to historically contextualize the growth of the community cultural arts movement grounded in the social and cultural equity activists movements that grew out of the Civil Rights Movement. The continuing mission and work of multidisciplinary community based cultural arts organizations challenge cultural and social inequities framing their creative work and organizational practices to assure equitable inclusion of the varying aesthetic criteria and expressions that reflect the multiethnic communities that are integral to the nations cultural identity. The first section of the course will take place in advocacy cultural arts community based organizations in the city. Community arts leaders in the field in collaboration with the class instructor will teach the course. This team teaching approach will afford students direct exposure and learning experiences with practitioners in the field within the communities they serve. In the second section of the course students will develop a project in collaboration with staff of one of the participating institutions. Students will have direct immersion within the community and the community organization understanding the operational and programmatic realities of the field as well as direct engagement in advocacy creative work. Students will be exposed to teaching strategies for working within communities that include readings, open discussions, as well as working on multidisciplinary collaborations in the field
TISCHUGCINE-GT 1128Consult CatalogTelevision SitcomThis course examines the history and politics of television’s most enduring genre, the situation comedy. The sitcom occupies a particularly important place in U.S. cultural hierarchies. Some see it as an innovative, quintessentially televisual form. For others it embodies mass culture's formulaic dross. But regardless of which side they may fall on, most scholars of TV history agree that the genre showcases U.S. preoccupations with class, race, gender, and other forms of difference, and that it simultaneously defines a particular kind of televisual aesthetic. How do we talk about this aesthetic—the distinctive typologies of character, plot, and mise-en-scene, and the unique institutional and narrative voices that find expression therein—in the context of debates over genre's political meanings? Such questions invite new ways of conceiving, and writing, genre criticism in TV, and that is the goal of this writing-intensive class.
TISCHUGCINE-UT 12Fall 2017Topics in TV Mad MenMad Men: Gender, Race, & Culture (Fall 2017) This course analyzes and contextualizes the complex, ambitious television series Mad Men (2007-2015), looking at Mad Men as both a televisual text and a window onto the past. We will talk about the series and its place within television's "new golden age," analyzing its narrative form and visual style. In addition to looking closely at the series itself, we will read and view historical materials from the era that Mad Men fictionalized, interrogating its representation of the 1960s. The course pays particular attention to how the series engages with historical and contemporary issues around gender and race, to better understand what Mad Men teaches us about the 1960s -- and how, in looking back, it helps us to better understand the present-day. In-class time will include screenings, lecture, and discussion. Out-of-class assignments include readings, additional screenings, and frequent writing
TISCHUGASPP-UT 1002Fall 2017Art Artist & Social Change4 points “ will count toward general education requirements (Humanities) Social, political, and economic upheavals produce shattering transformations in human life, yet some of the most significant artistic works in literature, visual arts, theatre, film, and music have been created under these extreme circumstances. The focus of this course is on developing an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of the arts, artists, and the artists ™ response as a catalyst for social and political change. We will explore the history of various practical crises and examine how they have influenced art and artists. Some of the examples include the works of Czechoslovakian films during Soviet Occupation, Protest Theatre during Apartheid South Africa, Shostakovich ™s Trio during Soviet Era, underground music scene in present day Iran, Cindy Sherman ™s photography in the USA, Croatian artist Sanjan Ivekovic and Bangali writer Taslima Nasrin ™s. We will also look at some examples of propaganda artists and their work as well, artists like Morteza Avini in Iran and Liu Wenxi of China. By investigating the artist ™s understanding of political, social, and economic forces that impact upon art and their own lives we will examine this question: What are the complex dynamics that are involved in the emergence of movements in the arts?
WAGNERGRADPADM-GP 2416Fall 2017Segregation and Public PolicyStudents in this course will explore the spatial aspects of inequality, including racial segregation, concentrated poverty, and government structure. Course materials will investigate the consequences of these inequalities for individuals, communities, and American society as a whole, as well as how these seemingly-intractable problems were created by and continue because of public policy decisions. This course will be an interactive experience, requiring preparation before coming to class and active exchange during class.
WAGNERGRADPADM-GP 2444Fall 2017LGBTQ Issues in Public PolicyThe advancement of LGBTQ rights in the United States has experienced unprecedented success over the last twenty years, shifting both public attitude towards and legal protection for gay Americans. This graduate level course will provide an in-depth analysis of current LGBTQ policy achievements in the United States, including the recognition of marriage equality in all 50-states, the repeal of Don ™t Ask, Don ™t Tell, and increased anti-discrimination protections. Emphasis will be placed on how these victories were achieved, including background on the strategies and tactics used to generate results. We will also take a critical look at such milestones, and examine what they mean for the entire LGTBQ population, including queer people of color, transgender and gender nonconforming individuals, the disabled, and economically disadvantaged. Incorporated into this analysis will be readings from queer liberation scholars to help us evaluate the pros and cons of existing LGBTQ policy gains. The course will explore what full equality might look like for LGBTQ people in the United States with an examination of what can and cannot actually be achieved through policy. Practical application on how policy is made will be intertwined throughout the course, as will select comparative readings to understand how U.S. LGBTQ policy impacts queer populations around the world
WAGNERGRADUPADM-GP 226Fall 2017Leadership: Women and Public PolicyWomen have engaged and been represented in public service in America through their fearless Women's Suffrage movement to gain the right to vote, which officially began in the 19th century, in 1848, during the Seneca Falls Convention, where the first women's rights convention, was held and was triumphantly realized in the early 20th century After a hard-fought series of votes in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures, when the Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution on August 20, 1920. To date, however, it is recognized, the road to elected and appointed office for women leaders is not equitable for those seeking to serve in public office. Although women make up the majority of our American population, women are the majority of registered voters and women graduate college at higher rates than men from post secondary education institutions; women are only a fraction of our elected and appointed officials. Statistics, big data analytics tell the sobering story. This course will teach offerings which underscore "Leadership, Women and Public Service in American Cities" charting the course and exploring the experience of women and girls in public service leadership. We will examine the context of equity for women in the structural realities and gender attitudes within the American political and civic systems. Our students will connect with women leaders and advocates for women leaders; we will teach women ™s historic and contemporary participation in public service. Utilizing political and Intersection theory we will focus on trends, implications and impact of ethnicity, race, class, gender & religion on women in politics and public service. Through coursework, guest speakers and hands-on activities students will learn how they can be a participant in and influence the public agenda through public service, politics and impacting public policy. The coursework will review leadership skills-set, career paths and analyze barriers that have traditionally kept women from achieving their political and leadership potential
WASHINGTON DCGRADUPADM-GP 9217Fall 2017Globalizing Social Activism:In 2008, for the first time in world history the number of people living in urban areas exceeded the number of people living in rural areas. By 2050 between 70% and 80% of the global population will live in and adjacent to cities. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course (1) examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities; (2) makes the case for sustainable urban development as a way to mitigate the impacts of population growth, globalization, social exclusion, and the effects of climate change. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing many themes, including: urban spatial planning and decision-making, slums and slum typology, urban economies, air and water quality, urban food systems, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and integrated design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine examples of social entrepreneurship and the power of information technology and social networks in political enfranchisement and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the pivotal role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future